Ethics + Religion – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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Pious drinking. Walter Dendy Sadler via Wikimedia Commons

Feeling guilty about drinking? Well, ask the saints

For those wondering whether it is sinful to drink, even moderately, a scholar goes into the history of alcohol and its distillation to show how early monks and priests contributed to it.
The newly completed execution chamber at Ely State Prison in Ely, Nevada. Nevada Department of Corrections via AP

Why Nevada’s new lethal injection is unethical

Nevada plans to use a new drug protocol for executing Scott Dozier, who murdered a 22-year-old. A scholar explains why this is problematic.
Some of the Facebook and Instagram ads used in 2016 election released by members of the U.S. House Intelligence committee. AP Photo/Jon Elswick

Why social media may not be so good for democracy

A scholar asks whether democracy itself is at risk in a world where social media is creating deeply polarized groups of individuals who tend to believe everything they hear.
Brazil’s jailhouse preachers may not explicitly condone violence against people of other faiths, but they’ve remained largely silent as their well-armed followers wage a holy war. Reuters/Ricardo Moraes

In Brazil, religious gang leaders say they’re waging a holy war

As hard-line Pentecostalism spreads across Brazil, some drug traffickers in gang-controlled areas of Rio de Janeiro are using religion as an excuse to attack nonbelievers.
Why does hazing happen? Roberto Herrera via Wikimedia Commons

Why hazing continues to be a rite of passage for some

Another student has died due to hazing. Research shows that there has been at least one such death in the US since 1954 (with 1958 the only exception). So why does hazing happen in the first place?
Mohandas K. Gandhi during a prayer meeting on Jan. 22, 1948. AP Photo/File

What Gandhi can teach today’s protesters

For Gandhi, whose birth anniversary is Monday, Oct. 2, nonviolent resistance meant placing one's own body in harm’s way to expose social injustices, which made it a powerful political tool.
A 1932 photograph showing the minaret of the Great Mosque of al-Nuri, Mosul. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

On Yom Kippur, remembering Mosul’s rich and diverse past

As Mosul rebuilds, its history is a reminder that people of many faiths lived in cooperation in the city. In the city was the Tomb of Prophet Jonah, venerated by Jews, Christians and Muslims alike.