Articles on Architecture

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Tile detail of RMIT’s Building 8, one of Peter Corrigan’s most famous designs. Rob Deutscher/Flickr

Remembering Peter Corrigan: a life of movement, energy and integrity

Peter Corrigan, one of Australia's most influential architects, died last week. A man of endless enthusiasm and curiosity, he shaped Melbourne's cityscape and influenced a generation of architects.
A quirk in the planning rules enabled the Primaries Warehouse in Fremantle to be redeveloped as a model of progressive higher-density design. Stuart Smith/Panoramio

Reinventing density: bending the rules can help stop urban sprawl

Exceptional projects can emerge when regulations are sensibly relaxed due to context. A Fremantle project is a model of progressive higher-density possibilities resulting from flexible planning rules.
Officer Woods’ competition entry shows how the wasted spaces of suburban road verges and front yards could be put to much better uses. Officer Woods

Reinventing density: overcoming the suburban setback

The front yards, footpaths and verges of Australian suburbs are spaces overdue for reinvention.
The Zelman Cowen award for Public Architecture was won by ARM Architecture for the Geelong Library & Heritage Centre. John Gollings

Hope and aspiration at the National Architecture Awards

Architects around the country are still abuzz, discussing the outcomes of the Australian National Architecture Awards, announced last Thursday. My Instagram feed that night was all jittery, as the nominees…
More than cluster of people and buildings, urbanity is a concentration of encounters and connections. Diliff/Wikimedia Commons

What makes a city tick? Designing the ‘urban DMA’

We're still in the early days of understanding how cities work. But we do know that creative, healthy and productive cities have certain things in common - and it's all to do with their 'urban DMA'.
Tim Ross conducting an Open House…Opening buildings to the curious public is helping to boost awareness of architecture. © Kylie Speer

Opening doors and minds: the Open House phenomenon

Since it began in London in 1992, the Open House movement has spread to 30 cities. Its events, which showcase everything from tiny apartments to grand homes, are cultivating a popular appreciation of architecture.
Performers march along the Great Wall of China in 2008. David Gray/Reuters

Dear Mr Trump: here’s how you build a wall

Donald Trump, if he takes the US presidency, will immediately start building a wall between Mexico and the US. What lessons can he take from that celebrated wall-builder, Chairman Mao?
As soon as we defined physical boundaries in buildings, we created the burglar who breaches them. Shutterstock

The burglar as architectural critic?

A new book, A Burglar's Guide to the City, strays into risky moral territory by lionizing the burglar as an urban and architectural trickster.
A ‘humble outback structure’: a former Afghan cameleer’s mosque in Bourke NSW. Copyright Iain Davidson/flickr

Friday essay: the Australian Mosque

Those opposed to the building of new mosques don't recognise their long history here, or potential to support Australian ideals. Mosques are part of our suburban landscape and can help overcome fears about Islam.
Unlike Dr Strangelove, few people learned to love the bomb – but it changed society nonetheless. Columbia Pictures

How Cold War anxieties still shape our world today

Think the Cold War is over? It may be, but its effects still cast a long shadow over society.
The Wigwam Motel in Holbrook, Arizona, is one of the few remnants of America’s mid-20th century motel boom. Library of Congress

The twilight of the mom and pop motel

What does the shuttering of traditional roadside motels say about America's relationship with travel and freedom?

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