Astronomy

Displaying 1 - 20 of 239 articles

Artist’s impression: Looking back 12.9-billion km towards the sun and the inner solar system from Sedna, one of the recently discovered minor planets in the Kuiper belt. NASA, ESA and Adolf Schaller

The long hunt for new objects in our expanding solar system

The search for new objects, including new planets, in our solar system has turned up some interesting finds. There have been a few failures over the years too.
The vast expanse of Western Australia is perfect for radio astronomy. Pete Wheeler, ICRAR

Tuning in to cosmic radio from the dawn of time

The Murchison Widefield Array sits in remote Western Australia far from noisy civilisation so it can help us understand the universe by tuning into radio waves from the distant cosmos.
Can a galaxy (like NGC 3810 in this case) have a classical spiral structure and also be already dead? ESA/Hubble and NASA

Is our Milky Way galaxy a zombie, already dead and we don’t know it?

Extragalactic astrophysicists want to know how and why galaxies stop forming stars, change their shape and fade away. With help from citizen scientists, they're figuring it out.
20 tons of Ohara E6 borosilicate glass being loaded onto the mold of one of the GMT’s mirrors. Ray Bertram, Steward Observatory

How do you build a mirror for one of the world’s biggest telescopes?

The laws of physics dictate that to pick out ever fainter objects from space and see them more sharply, we're going to need a bigger telescope. And that means we need massive mirrors.
The November 27 fireball as photographed by the Desert Fireball Network observatory at William Creek, South Australia. Desert Fireball Network

How to find a meteorite that’s fallen to Earth

It's no easy task to find a meteorite that's just been seen flashing across the sky. But it helps if you have an automatic network of "eyes" on the night sky.
NASA’s Juno probe will be the fastest object humanity has ever created when it approaches Jupiter. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Exploring the solar system: the best of what you can look out for in 2016

From the high-speed journey to Jupiter to solar eclipses, meteor showers and planetary alignments visible in the skies above -- add these space highlights to your 2016 calendar.
A brilliant fireball lights up the sky above the Southern Ocean at the 12 Apostles National Park on the Great Ocean Road, Victoria, Australia. Alex Cherney

Look up! Your guide to some of the best meteor showers for 2016

Many meteor showers are a regular annual event, but what you can see varies from year to year. So which showers will be the best for 2016?
A highlight of 2015 was the number of weird and wonderful exoplanets that were found. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Space in 2015 was out of this world

From a flyby of Pluto to the search for extrasolar planets and gravitational waves, 2015 was a monumental year for space news.
‘What difference would it make to human life if a celestial event were unequivocally linked to the very night of Jesus’ birth?’ Nathan Rupert/Flickr

Does it matter if there was really a Star of Bethlehem?

What difference would it make to human life if a celestial event were unequivocally linked to the very night of Jesus’ birth?
The Dreamtime constellation of The Emu rises out of the glow of Sydney, 350km away from the Australian Astronomical Observatory. David Malin

Darkness is disappearing and that’s bad news for astronomy

Darkness is precious to astronomers, but it's also good for everybody. We should ensure we preserve the dark by using the latest technologies responsibly.
A telescope can open up on the wonders of the heavens. Grand Canyon National Park/Flickr

What to look for when buying a telescope

Stargazing in your back yard or on a camping trip can amaze and inspire. If you're thinking of buying a telescope, here are a few key things you should look out for.

Top contributors

More