Articles on Domestic violence

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Gable Tostee was found not guilty of the murder of Warriena Wright, who fell from his balcony. AAP/Dan Peled/Queensland Supreme Court

Gable Tostee case: how common is death by falling?

Cases of homicide by falling are rare. But the Gable Tostee case is not the first instance of a fall from a building causing death being linked to criminal conduct.
It’s not easy to walk away from an abusive relationship without the support of a flexible employer. AAP Image/Angela Brkic

Paid domestic violence leave: how do other countries do it?

It's uncommon internationally for workers to have a statutory right to paid domestic violence leave, but things may be shifting.
The logic is that violence is a choice, so men can be reasonably expected to stop. luxorphoto/Shutterstock

To stop domestic violence, we need to change perpetrators’ behaviour

Thousands of Australian men are sitting on waiting lists every year to get help to end their violent behaviour – even though behaviour change programs can reduce their likelihood of offending again.
Sydney’s Kings Cross and CBD are safer as a result of the lockout measures, but it has come at a cost to the precincts’ ‘vibrancy’. AAP/April Fonti

Callinan review largely backs Sydney lockout laws, but alcohol’s role in family violence is a blind spot

A review of Sydney's lockout laws found the objective of reducing alcohol- and drug-related assaults and anti-social behaviour remain valid, and the measures introduced are achieving this.
A number of egregious incest cases have been reported in Australia in recent years. shutterstock

Incest: why is ‘worst of the worst’ abuse so often ignored?

The once-taboo topics of domestic violence and institutional abuse are now front-page news, but repeated reports of incest have not registered in public awareness as evidence of a serious problem.
Family murder was understood as a sign of larger ills. Shutterstock

Familicides – how apartheid killed its own

During the 1980s, press coverage of South African family murders suggested that something was ‘wrong’ with white society – and with the white Afrikaans men who were usually seen as perpetrators.

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