Articles on Indonesia

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One of the minors reunites with family and friends in Rote, East Nusa Tenggara, after being released from Australian prison. Antje Missbach

Compensating underage people smugglers from Indonesia for their unlawful treatment in Australia

Efforts to claim compensation for Indonesian minors who were caught manning boats that smuggled asylum seekers to Australia may end up failing if the Australian government continues to resist.
Characters in Wiro Sableng (from left to right) : Anggini (Sherina Munaf), Bujang Gila Tapak Sakti (Fariz Alfarazi), Wiro Sableng (Vino G. Bastian), the Prince (Yusuf Mahardhika) and Rara Murni (Aghniny Haque) Eriek Juragan

Wiro Sableng: a revival of Indonesian martial arts genre?

Many consider _Wiro_ is a superhero movie but from its cinematic elements and style, _Wiro Sableng_ is closer to martial arts or _silat_ genre.
A bridge in Palu, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia, was destroyed in the recent earthquake and tsunami. AP Photo/Aaron Favila

An Indonesian city’s destruction reverberates across Sulawesi

The devastation of the recent earthquake and tsunami might be most visible in Palu, the capital city of Central Sulawesi. But the province’s rural areas could ultimately suffer the most.
Moments after an earthquake in Palu, Friday 29 September 2018, thousands of houses and people in the area were swallowed by the ground because of liquefaction. Mast Irham/EPA

2012 research had identified Indonesian city Palu as high risk of liquefaction

While the term liquafaction has only been widely discussed in Indonesia and the world in the past week, Palu's susceptibility to liquefy had already been studied.
Limited availability of heavy equipment and humanitarian aid makes it hard for victims of disaster in Palu, Donggala, Sigi and Parigi-Moutong. EPA/Hotli Simanjuntak

Indonesia urgently needs to set up a humanitarian logistics system

Following an earthquake and tsunami in Central Sulawesi on Friday, search and rescue workers in Central Sulawesi struggle to save victims trapped under rubble due to lack of heavy equipment.
One of the survivors of Indonesia’s 1965-1966 anti-communist violence, Sa'anah from Palu, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. Adrian Mulya, from Penyintas Kehidupan [Winners of Life], Jakarta: KPG, 2014.

Palu earthquake and tsunami swept away some of Indonesia’s most important human rights activism

Palu, the capital city of Central Sulawesi province in Indonesia, recently devastated by an earthquake and tsunami, is a trailblazing city with progressive human rights initiatives.
There are many barriers to the implementation of the Anti-Domestic Violence Law. In particular, the community has yet to be adequately educated about domestic violence laws.

Why stigma against victims of domestic violence persists in Indonesia

It has been 14 years since Indonesia enacted the Anti-Domestic Violence Law, but victims are still stigmatised for speaking out.
Incumbent presidential candidate Joko Widodo (left) and his running mate, K.H. Ma'ruf Amin, wave after registering for Indonesia’s 2019 presidential election at the General Election Commission (KPU) office in Jakarta. Bagus Indahono/EPA

Power at what cost? Those left out of Indonesia’s 2019 presidential election

This article aims to name the elephant in the room – the negative impacts of Ma'ruf's nomination on minority groups.
Indonesian traditional dance performance Reog Ponorogo depicts intimate same-sex relationships between two characters, warok (men) and gemblak (boys). shutterstock

On gender diversity in Indonesia

Culturally, Indonesians have long recognised sexual and gender diversity as part of their daily lives.
Ride-hailing services have gone global, and even women in Saudi Arabia – only recently given the right to drive – are getting in on the action. In this June 2018 photo, a female driver for Careem, a regional ride-hailing Uber competitor, is seen behind the wheel. AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

Canada left behind as ride-hailing services go global

Canada is simply a consumer of ride-hailing services, and has not established any of its own Ubers or Lyfts, even as tiny countries like Estonia get in on the game. That needs to change.
In an attempt to secure their market, conventional taxis enforce “red zones” – areas where online taxi drivers are barred from picking up passengers. This makes it difficult of people with disabilities to access transportation options. www.shutterstock.com

People with disabilities bear the brunt of turf wars between conventional and online taxis

Instead of being cheaper and safer, getting an online taxi can actually be dangerous for people with disabilities where a so-called "red zone" is in force.

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