Articles on Indonesia

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The 18th Asian Games in Indonesia has every potential as an alternative means to promote peace. www.shutterstock.com

Can the Asian Games promote peace?

How can sporting events like the Asian Games contribute to global peace?
The leaders of the 18 Asia-Pacific economies pose for a family photo in Vancouver in 1997. Indonesia’s Suharto is sixth from the left. Protests against human rights violations were kept hidden from Suharto during the summit. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

When Canada did – and didn’t – stand up for human rights

Canada's clashes with Indonesia in the 1990s over human rights abuses contain lessons for the current Canadian-Saudi Arabian diplomatic dispute.
Dutch Memorial Day commemorated in Amsterdam, May 4, 2014. Nationaal Comité 4 en 5 mei, Jasper Juinen

Dutch Memorial Day: Erasing people after death

As the anniversary of Indonesian independence from the Netherlands approaches, a close look reveals how Dutch policy divides people along racial lines and ignores the Indonesian dead in that war.
Indonesian President Joko Widodo (centre left) shakes hands with his vice-presidential running mate, Ma'ruf Amin (centre right), during a meeting with supporters before registering their bid for the 2019 election in Jakarta, Indonesia. Mast Irham/EPA

‘Conservative turn’ will continue in Indonesian presidential election next year

Ma’ruf Amin's selection as Joko Widodo's running mate in his re-election bid means that politicians continue to accommodate the conservative turn among Indonesian Islamic groups to win votes.
A villager in Papua carries a baby across a river. Indigenous people in Indonesia and Australia value the importance of community and a wide circle of carers in the first 1,000 days of a child’s life. www.shutterstock.com

‘It takes a village to raise a child’

Participants of roundtable forums in Australia and Indonesia last year agree that parents' extended family and community hold an important role in caring for children within their first 1000 days.
In the medical culture of the Bugis and Makassar peoples in Indonesia the word koroq means that the penis is actually shrinking, or retracting, but the Dutch in the 19th-century East Indies did not believe it was real. shutterstock

Is shrinking penis syndrome a delusion or a real thing?

Koro is widely believed to be a culturally localised delusion. But a theory that it's a fight-or-flight reflex might be corroborated by studying traditional healing treatments in Indonesia.
More than 250,000 people took to the streets in a 2016 protest organised by hardline Muslim groups against Jakarta’s Christian mayor. Lauren Farrow/AAP

Is Indonesia retreating from democracy?

Indonesia has long been held up as a model of democratic transition in the Muslim world. This view of the country now needs rethinking.
Cocos Malay photo from the 1910s showing a wedding procession that is still practised today with the groom pictured going to the bride’s house accompanied by members of the community. Wikimedia Commons/From the book 'Coral reefs and islands' authored by Jones, F. Wood (Frederic Wood), 1879-1954, Published by Lovell Reeve & Co. , Ltd. London. Photo digitized by Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

A group of Southeast Asian descendants wants to be recognised as Indigenous Australians

In the 1800s, a group of Southeast Asians were taken to the Cocos (Keeling) Islands, now part of Australia, by an English merchant. Their descendants are seeking Indigenous status from Australia.

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