Interest rates

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The fight for lower or no university fees should be taken beyond campuses to places where South Africa’s financial elite rule. Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

Only pressure on South Africa’s elites can ease university fee stress

The next step in South African students' fight against high university fees could be taken beyond campuses. The final battle will be fought at the country's National Treasury and Reserve Bank.
Will home owners consider the non-bank sector as major banks increase lending rates? Reuters/David Gray

Rising mortgage rates - is it time to refinance your home loan?

Last week, Westpac hoisted its lending rate by 20 basis points in a bid to recover the costs of recent capital raisings. There is speculation other banks will follow. Australia’s non-bank lenders could…
It may take a magic wand from the RBA (or the Turnbull government) for Australia to escape a recession. Sam Mooy/AAP

All eyes on the Aussie dollar as Australia stalks recession

Volatility is not going away any time soon, and if the US Fed decision plays the wrong way on the Australian dollar, our central bank could soon be back in the jawboning business.
Sharemarket volatility demonstrates global frothiness; nevertheless the case is weak for an interest rates cut. AAP/Dan Peled

Trouble looms, so rates should hold

The best course of action for the Reserve Bank is to hold off changing rates; but the longer term case for an increase is changing.
Reserve Bank of India Governor Raghuram Rajan has taken a no-nonsense approach to curbing inflation. Danish Siddiqui/Reuters

India debates monetary policy in shadow of US rate rise

Monetary policy involves more than managing inflation, which is why it sometimes takes a committee to decide interest rates.
Running the economy is a bit like running a race… Jogger wall via

How the Federal Reserve keeps the US economy from bonking

My buddy is training for his third Chicago Marathon. I’m preparing for a 10K mud-run. He’s really fit and a family nurse practitioner, so I seek his advice on how to get in shape and what to eat. His advice…
That $550 from the carbon tax repeal might be in your bank account, or it might have been gobbled up by exchange rates. baranq/

Trying to measure the savings from the carbon tax is a mug’s game

The carbon tax repeal was supposed to save the average household A$550. And it might well have done, but teasing out the exact figure amid the myriad other economic factors is a herculean task.

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