Articles on Lesotho

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Carefully tracking the migration habits of birds like the Barn Swallow can help to conserve these species. Shutterstock

Why a proper record of birds in Africa is so important – for Europe

If Europe is going to reap the benefits of conservation measures at home, its experts need an understanding of where “their” birds migrate to when they head off to Africa.
Kayentapus ambrokholohali footprints belong to an animal of about 26 feet long, dwarfing all the life around it. Theropod image adapted by Lara Sciscio, with permission, from an illustration by Scott Hartman

Meet the giant dinosaur that roamed southern Africa 200 million years ago

Until this discovery, theropod dinosaurs were thought to be considerably smaller, at three to five metres in body length, during the Early Jurassic.
Lesotho voters wait patiently to cast their ballot. EPA/Kim Ludbrook

Why Lesotho’s in such a mess and what can be done about it

Politics in Lesotho can look incredibly complicated, with a mish-mash of competing political parties and repeated military interventions. It’s a mess, but it’s not that hard to unravel.
A woman votes in Zambia. Beyond multi-party systems and regular elections, many countries resemble very little of true democracies. GovernmentZA/Flickr

Democracy is looking sickly across southern Africa

Democracy is in a parlous state in many countries in southern Africa. Autocrats hold onto power, while electorates have little to choose from at the polls.
Local people at Tendaguru (Tanzania) excavation site in 1909 with Giraffatitan fossils. Wikimedia Commons/Public domain

It’s time to celebrate Africa’s forgotten fossil hunters

Africa has one of the world's richest fossil records, and evidence suggests that amateurs collected really important fossils long before professionals arrived on the scene.
Presidents Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, Muhammadu Buhari, Macky Sall and former Ghanian President John Mahama at a special meeting of Ecowas on The Gambia. Reuters/Afolabi Sotunde

What southern Africa can learn from west Africa about dealing with despots

SADC's credibility is at stake. Its lack of political will in acting decisively against despots is at odds with the African Union's goal of promoting legitimate governance on the continent.
Children pump water at communal tap in Durban, South Africa. The country is facing a mounting water infrastructure challenge. REUTERS/Rogan Ward

South Africa’s water sector: a case study in state capture

Massive state capture activity is taking place in the South African water sector under the guise of radical economic transformation, threatening financial sustainability and water supply.
Hair speaks of the past, and of cultural heritage. Steve Evans/Flickr

The heritage of hair: stories of resilience and creativity

Hair has long been modified for aesthetic and other ends. But skewed power structures have meant that women, particularly women of colour, have borne the brunt of stereotyping and prejudice.
Cattle drink water from an almost dry dam in South Africa. The drought in the region is one of a number of troubling issues that remain largely hidden from public sight. Reuters/Rogan Ward

Southern Africa is hobbled by the language and legacy of its histories

One of the many intriguing ideas of the Austrian philosopher, Ludwig Wittgenstein, was this: the limits of my language means the limits of my world. Does this explain the failure to see the gathering gloom…

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