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Winning the support of workers may be key to Democrats winning the 2020 election. Reuters/Lucas Jackson

How Democrats can win back workers in 2020

Hillary Clinton arguably lost in 2020 because she took workers for granted. Will Democrats make the same mistake again?
An exterior view of the Indonesian Constitusional Court building in Jakarta. Bagus Indahono/EPA

Prabowo challenges Indonesia’s poll result at Constitutional Court but doubts its impartiality. New research confirms the court’s fairness

Providing the first empirical analysis of the court's performance in high-profile cases between 2004 and 2016, our research indicates that its independence from the government remains intact.
Twenty-two of the 24 Democratic 2020 presidential candidates. Reuters

Why are there so many candidates for president?

The number of candidates in presidential primaries has skyrocketed since the 2016 election. Divisions inside political parties and easy ways for candidates to raise money are among the reasons why.
Vice-president candidates Ma'ruf Amin (L) and Sandiaga Uno (R) during their debate in Jakarta, Indonesia, on 17 March 2019. Adi Weda/EPA

It’s a draw. In Indonesia’s vice-presidential debate, both candidates fail to offer relevant programs

We contacted four academics to provide analysis of the candidates' visions and program planning. They all concluded that nobody won the debate.
Presidential candidates Joko Widodo (second left) and Prabowo Subianto (second right) greet each other at the debate among candidates in Jakarta, Indonesia, 17 January 2019. Adi Weda/EPA

Both Indonesia’s presidential candidates – Jokowi and Prabowo – fail to show commitment to eradicate corruption in latest debate

No concrete measures to eradicate corruption were offered by the two candidates – Joko "Jokowi" Widodo and Prabowo Subianto – in the latest presidential debate.
Presidential candidate Joko “Jokowi” Widodo (left) shakes hand with Presidential candidate Prabowo Subianto during a debate among candidates in Jakarta, Indonesia, 17 January 2019. Adi Weda/EPA

Either Jokowi or Prabowo, Indonesia’s future in human rights enforcement remains bleak

Joko "Jokowi" Widodo may claim that he is not a human rights offender like his rival, Prabowo Subianto, but his track record during his tenure may indicate otherwise.
President Joko Widodo (second right) and his vice-presidential running mate, Ma'ruf Amin (right), and their rivals, presidential candidate Prabowo Subianto (second left) and running mate Sandiaga Uno, pose with the electoral numbers that will represent them in next year’s presidential election, during a draw at the General Election Commission office in Jakarta in September. Bagus Indahono/EPA

Incumbent Jokowi versus Prabowo – who will win Indonesia’s presidential election?

Incumbent President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo may have won hearts among potential voters by building roads, airports and ports, but his opponents can still bring him down with other issues.
With over a dozen candidates and an incarcerated front-runner, Brazil’s 2018 presidential election has political analysts shrugging their shoulders. AP Photo/Leo Correa

Brazilian candidate still crushing his rivals from jail

Leftist former President Lula da Silva is the clear favorite in Brazil's 2018 presidential race, leading his closest rival — a firebrand conservative — by 15 points. The only problem: He's in jail.
Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO), right, with Delfina Gomez of his MORENA party. Gómez narrowly lost the Mexico State governor’s race on June 4 but gave her party a boost for the presidency. Carlos Jasso/REUTERS

In Mexico, a firebrand leftist provokes the powers that be – including Donald Trump

Can Andrés Manuel López Obrador, Mexican politics' long-time left-wing rabble rouser, finally win the presidency?
To serve another term as president of Paraguay, where reelection is not allowed, Horacio Cartes might need to resign first. Jorge Adorno/Reuters

Should Paraguay allow its presidents to be reelected?

Paraguay doesn't allow presidents to be reelected, but three of the five candidates setting their sights on 2018 are current or former heads of state.

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