Articles on UC Grad Slam 2015

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A puma and her two kittens look out over San Jose, California. Cchristopher Fust

How humans threaten pumas just by being nearby

Many Americans move to rural areas to live near nature. But the mere presence of humans changes wildlife behavior in ways that may have ripple effects.
UCSF neuroscience grad student Sama Ahmed, whose three-minute talk on ‘how to know your species’ won first place at the campuswide contest, will compete for the Grad Slam championship in Oakland May 4. Susan Merrell/UCSF

Why more scientists are needed in the public square

The president of one of the country's leading research university systems argues that the academic community has to make sure researchers and scientists engage with the general public.
The Sahel, the transition zone between the arid north of Africa and tropic south, has highly variable rainfall. Center for International Forestry Research.

Native shrubs: a simple fix for drought-stricken crops in Sub-Saharan Africa

Field trials in Senegal show native shrubs can access deep-soil water and make it available to adjacent crops – a technique that could alleviate drought conditions in marginal lands around the world.
Jean Paul Santos with the finished 4x4 sub-array antenna assembly that may help rovers talk directly with Earth. Matthew Chin

Talking to Mars: new antenna design could aid interplanetary communication

New research provides a compact but powerful way for Mars rovers to communicate directly with Earth via an array of smaller antenna elements, bypassing the need for an intermediary.
Members of the Chitimacha language team (from left to right) Sam Boutte, Kim Walden and Rachel Vilcan use the new language software for the first time.

Renaissance on the bayou: the revival of a lost language

In the face of war, disease and outside cultural pressures, the Chitimacha language has survived -- and now thrives.
A sensor monitors carbon dioxide from the rooftop of the SF Exploratorium. Alexis Shusterman

Low-cost sensors track CO2 where it counts

Scientists build network of inexpensive air monitors to track emissions with fine-grained spatial detail – an alternative to satellites or pricey land-based CO2 monitors.

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