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Articles on Inuit

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Grey Owl was an original ‘pretendian,’ portraying himself as the the son of a Scottish man and Apache woman after moving to Canada in the early 1900s. (Canadian National Railways/Library and Archives Canada, e010861684)

Fraudulent claims of indigeneity: Indigenous nations are the identity experts

Those quick to call-out are often not clamouring for Indigenous nations’ jurisdiction over citizenship, nor are they demanding “pretendians” be held accountable to Indigenous nations.
In this episode, two Indigenous scientists offer a different theory of pollution — one that includes colonialism at its root. This understanding may help us make a better future. Here, logging activities in Australia. Matt Palmer/Unsplash

Why pollution is as much about colonialism as chemicals — Don’t Call Me Resilient transcript EP 11

Colonialism is manifested by the way pollution impacts the lives of Indigenous peoples in Canada. Two Indigenous environmental scientists discuss how they’ve overcome obstacles in their research.
For some Indigenous people, participating in Canadian elections continues the legitimacy of the Canadian state. (Shutterstock)

A vote for Canada or Indigenous Nationhood? The complexities of First Nations, Métis and Inuit participation in Canadian politics

Indigenous people who vote are reminding Canada of the nation-to-nation relationships that continue to exist and to bring change from within the very structure that has been used to erase them.
Jesse Popp is an Indigenous scholar who is regularly inundated with requests for input and assistance. Here she shares a few things you should consider before reaching out to an Indigenous scholar. (Jesse Popp)

Want to reach out to an Indigenous scholar? Awesome! But first, here are 10 things to consider

As people recognize the value in weaving together knowledge systems and move towards reconciliation, Indigenous Peoples are being increasingly approached.
At the beginning of the 12-day celebration of life ceremony, Elder Wendy Phillips performs a smudge. (Josh Lyon)

Who decides what’s essential? The importance of Indigenous ceremony during COVID-19

Was participating in ceremony despite pandemic restrictions an act of Indigenous resistance and resurgence and did it reflect reassertion of nationhood and self-determination?
Queen’s University professor Celeste Pedri-Spade says a basic first question to determine identity is: ‘Who is your grandmother?“ Here a group of Métis children and two women sitting on a large rock, Fort Chipewyan, Alberta, 1931. H. S. Spence, Canada. Department of Mines and Technical Surveys. Library and Archives Canada, PA-014406 /

Stolen identities: What does it mean to be Indigenous? Don’t Call Me Resilient Podcast EP 8 Transcript

Transcript for Don’t Call Me Resilient Podcast EP 8: Stolen identities: What does it mean to be Indigenous?
Being Indigenous is more than just genealogy. Here Lorralene Whiteye from the Ojibway Nation checks her hair in a mirror before the start of a healing ceremony, held by Toronto Indigenous Harm Reduction, to commemorate the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Toronto. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Evan Buhler

Stolen identities: What does it mean to be Indigenous? Don’t Call Me Resilient Podcast EP 8

In recent years, some prominent people have been called out for falsely claiming Indigenous identity. Why would someone falsely claim an identity? And what does it mean to be Indigenous?
A temporary memorial for Canada’s residential schools is blessed by Indigenous elders in a pipe ceremony in Calgary in August 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Bill Graveland

Reckoning with the truths of unmarked graves of Indigenous children, education systems must take action

Here’s what the education system needs to do to help teachers address, repair and heal education towards and beyond reconciliation.
The children’s book, Little Louis, tells the story of a young boy preparing for his COVID-19 vaccination. (Morning Star Lodge)

Indigenous children’s book ‘Little Louis’ aims to curb COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy with a culturally relevant story

There is an urgent need to combat historically fuelled vaccine hesitancy within Indigenous communities. The best way to do this is through evidence-based knowledge and community-led work.
Orange flags fly representing children who died while attending Indian residential schools in Canada, at Major’s Hill Park in Ottawa, on July 1, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

When ‘good intentions’ don’t matter: The Indian Residential School system

Variations on the myth of “good intentions” are invoked as a tool against the truth that the legacy of the IRS tells. Here’s why that needs to stop.
A man hangs a protest banner where the Egerton Ryerson statue used to sit at Ryerson University. The statue was toppled in June by those protesting the discovery of graves at Indian Residential Schools. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Suburban monumentalism: How do we change Indigenous-settler relations when there are no statues to destroy?

The suburban-built environment whitewashes the violence and theft on which Canada is built.
Margot King, age four, touches an orange flag, representing children who died at Indian Residential Schools in Canada, placed in the grass at Major’s Hill Park in Ottawa, on July 1, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Honour those found at residential schools by respecting the human rights of First Nations children today

Canadians who wish to pay tribute to the children who died at Indian Residential Schools should demand the government stop fighting First Nations children in court.
Protesters wave a flag at Parliament Hill in Ottawa at a “Cancel Canada Day” protest in response to the discovery of hundreds of unmarked graves at Indian Residential Schools. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Patrick Doyle THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Patrick Doyle

Indian Residential School tragic discoveries see calls for action, but words can make a difference too

People often decry words and call for action after tragic events. But words are action and they’re fundamental to Canadian democracy.

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