Menu Close

Articles on Religion and society

Displaying 1 - 20 of 671 articles

The Catholic hymn, “Te Deum” – which says, “You, God, we praise” – has been used for centuries in Catholic worship for thanksgiving. Iconotheca Valvasoriana Author Jean Marot via Wikimedia Commons.

How medieval Catholic traditions of thanksgiving prayers and feasting shaped the Protestant celebration of Plymouth’s pilgrims

The Pilgrims who started the first Thanksgiving tradition after they landed in Plymouth were following the customs they had grown up with, originating in medieval times.
The vast majority of Buddhists in historical and contemporary times have been followers of Mahāyāna Buddhism. Fred de Noyelle / Godong/Stone via Getty Images

What is Mahāyāna Buddhism? A scholar of Buddhism explains

The Mahāyāna branch of Buddhism likely emerged around the first centuries A.D. and was most readily carried through the Silk Road and maritime trade routes.
It’s one thing to agree to combat antisemitism. It’s another thing to agree on what it means. goglik83/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Antisemitism isn’t just ‘Jew-hatred’ – it’s anti-Jewish racism

Combatting antisemitism isn’t just about ‘calling it out’ – it’s about helping people understand what antisemitism is in the first place.
Fear about women’s power was an essential part of ancient anxiety about witchcraft. Vinicius Rafael / EyeEm via Getty Images

What Greek myth tells us about modern witchcraft

From ancient Greece to modern-day TikTok witchcraft, the world of witches has been a changing one.
In much of the media outside Iran, female protesters not wearing the headscarf have been highlighted as symbols of defiance. AP Photo/Middle East Images, File

The veil in Iran has been an enduring symbol of patriarchal norms – but its use has changed depending on who is in power

The veil as a symbol of oppression has once again moved to center stage in Iran, but it’s important to know about the history of veiling – and mandatory unveiling.
Monsters and spirits –including ‘tsukumogami,’ which are made of everyday objects – in the ‘Hyakki-Yagyō-Emaki’ scroll, painted between the 14th and 16th centuries. Wikimedia Commons

Japan’s ‘waste not, want not’ philosophy has deep religious and cultural roots, from monsters and meditation to Marie Kondo’s tidying up

Shinto and Buddhist ideas about interconnectedness have deeply influenced Japan, shaping centuries-old rituals and stories whose impact continues today.

Top contributors

More