Children at a Koranic school in Mombasa, Kenya. Michał Huniewicz/Flickr

Arab-Islamic education in Sub-Saharan Africa: going beyond clichés to build the future

In Sub-Saharan Africa, Arab-Islamic education is neither a limited nor recent phenomena. While poorly understood, it remains a fundamental part of the educational development of the region.
On March 18 in Tempe, Arizona, an Uber self-driving car struck and killed Elaine Herzberg, who was walking her bicycle across a street. The human driver was supposed to be monitoring the car’s behaviour, but did not do so. Its systems apparently did not detect the victim, as it neither slowed down nor tried to avoid hitting Herzberg Wikimedia

Artificial intelligence: between scientific, ethical and commercial issues

The report of the mathematician and deputy of Essonne Cédric Villani renders his report on artificial intelligence today.
David Davis and Michel Barnier in Brussels. So how’s Davis going to get out of this one? Francois Lenoir/Reuters

‘Hang on a minute lads, I’ve got a great idea!’ Brexit, crisis management and sensemaking

March 30 officially marked one year to go before the Brexit clock strikes. How can the "leave" camp get out of this one? The classic 1969 heist movie 'The Italian Job' provides clues.
An Egyptian street vendor selling bread walks past as a tear gas canister (background) fired by riot police during clashes with protesters near Cairo’s Tahrir Square on January 29, 2013. Khhaled Desouki/AFP

How to assess political stability? Follow the bread path

In Morocco, bread is not only a symbol for wider demands but also the material basis of affordable and just living conditions.
Sweden is studying the possibility of an “e-krona”, an electronic form of the country’s currency. Shutterstock

Central-bank digital currencies: toward a cashless society?

With countries such as China and Sweden are studying plans to create a new form of money – a central-bank digital currency. CBDCs risk revolutionizing both the way money is created and distributed.
When the Human Genome Project completed its work in 2003, the entire human genome was published in book form. Stephen C. Dickson/Wikimedia

Reading the entire human genome – one long sentence at a time

In 2003 the Human Genome Project "cracked the code of life", yet parts of our DNA remained unidentified. A new study fills out our genetic blueprint by using a nanotechnology-based technique.
President Donald Trump delivers remarks at the Pentagon on January 18, 2018. Dominique A. Pineiro/Flickr

A friendly reminder: impeaching Donald Trump will not remove him from office

Not a day passes without fresh speculation about the possible impeachment of Donald Trump, but history indicates that – barring a dramatic turn of events – he is likely to serve out his first term.
Workers at Fukushima in January 2018. Behrouz Mehri/AFP

Fukushima seven years later: case closed?

On March 11, 2011, a nuclear disaster struck Japan. Translated testimony by the power plant's manager reveals how close the world came to a greater catastrophe -- and how much there is to be learned.
People queuing to withdraw cash at an ATM. Demonetisation in India has not met its target and actually reinforced informal networks. Santosh Kumar

The shock of Indian demonetisation: a failed attempt to formalise the economy

Instead of a clear movement toward more formalised economic transactions, demonetisation in India has reinforced the informal economy.
At the Cent Quatre (104) cultural center in Paris. Accelimage

The hypothesis of cultural third places

Cultural venues are changing as a result of digital progress, reduced public finances and the strategic nature of knowledge in a knowledge-based economy.
Could a North-African migrant become the Prime minister of a European country in the 21st century? In the 19th century, a Greek slave rose to the highest ranks in Tunis. The Bey of Tunis, Muhammad Sādiq Bāšā-Bey, greets Napoleon III in Algiers, on 20 September 1860. A. de Belle Ksar Saïd Museum

Migrants: when Europeans once flocked to North African shores

When we think of migrants, we think of them crossing the Mediterranean to come to Europe. Yet 200 years ago, many did it the other way.

 

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