The president of Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro, meets with Russian president Vladimir Putin in 2015. In the 2018 Transparency International report, Venezuela ranks 168 and Russia ranks 138. The least-corrupt country in the world is Denmark, followed by strong democracies such as New Zealand, Finland, Sweden and Switzerland. kremlin.ru

Can corruption kill democracy?

The rankings in Transparency International's 2018 index shows that highly democratic countries tend to have low levels of corruption. Is there something inherent in corruption that can kill democracy?
Women in Mexico City carry a banner reading “Legal and safe abortion across Mexico” during the commemoration of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women (November 25, 2018). Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP

Is the future of abortion online?

While the abortion debate continues worldwide, even in countries where it has long been legal, new drugs and telemedicine services could provide access to safe abortion beyond borders and laws.
If they cannot be completely prevented, detecting computer attacks as early as possible helps to limit their costs. Shutterstock

Cybersecurity: high costs for companies

The cost of computer attacks to companies is difficult to quantify precisely. One thing is certain, however: it is constantly improving. As is the case with defensive measures...
Bhutan’s prime minister Lotay Tshering (left) with India’s Narendra Modi prior to a meeting in New Delhi in December 2018. Prakash Singh/AFP

What can the kingdom of Bhutan teach us about fighting corruption

Bhutan, a poor country, ranks 26th out of 180 countries surveyed on corruption. How does the kingdom fight such issue and what can we learn from such experience?
Optical fibres carry data from the web, these cables were previously neutral containers – but not anymore. Groman123/Flickr

The end of web neutrality, the end of the Internet?

Until last December, Internet service providers were required to respect the principle of web neutrality. This is no longer the case in the United States. What are the consequences?
Migrants on a ship intercepted offshore near the Libyan town of Gohneima, east of the capital Tripoli, in July 2018. Libyan Coast Guard via AP, File

Europe’s refugee crisis explains why border walls don’t stop migration

After 1.3 million migrants from the Middle East and Africa came to Europe in 2015, many countries built fences or closed their ports. That has pushed migrants to take riskier routes into the EU.
Hindu right wing supporters backed by the Bharatiya Janata Party march to protest women entering the premises of Sabarimala temple, in South India, Kerala, Jan 3, claiming ‘respect for traditions’. KannanVM/Wikimedia

Sabarimala temple: How the Indian media fell into the trap of caste and gender stereotypes

The recent controversy, sloganeering and protests about Sabarimala temple in the Indian state of Kerala obscure the way that the media have used stereotypes of women and caste again and again.
Police use water cannons against a demonstrator, Nantes, western France, on September 15, 2016. LOIC VENANCE / AFP

‘When the revolution becomes the State it becomes my enemy again’: an interview with James C. Scott

In an exclusive interview, Professor James Scott discusses anarchism and State resistance by so-called “powerless” actors. Excerpts for The Conversation France.
Social progress is not just a dream. But humanity needs to combine its forces and move away from exclusive currents if it wants to make it real. Sylvia Fredriksson/Flickr

Is it still possible to believe in social progress?

Humankind has today reached a historical peak in developing its strengths. It should use it to create a human community of nations inclusive on all fronts : scholars can help.
German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks during the Deutscher Arbeitgebertag congress, organised by the Confederation of German Employers’ Associations (BDA) and gathering German employers in Berlin on November 22, 2018. Wolfgang Kumm/AFP

Questioning the claim of Germany’s ‘employment miracle’

The labour market inequalities and economic insecurity are stoking discontent from the Rhine to the Seine.

 

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