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Articles sur Aspirin

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It is hard for doctors to change their clinical practise in the light of new medical evidence. Shame, loss of professional self-worth and fear of malpractice lawsuits are some of the reasons. (Shutterstock)

The new truth about Aspirin, and your doctor’s slow uptake of medical evidence

Evidence now shows that for the majority of healthy people, the risks of bleeding with a daily Aspirin outweigh any heart benefits. How long will it take for your doctor to tell you?
In this 2012 photo, grandmother Janet Kitheka, 63, collects her adopted “granddaughter” Lucy, 13, at the end of the school day in the yard of the Hot Courses Primary School, in the village of Nyumbani which caters to children who lost their parents to HIV, and grandparents who lost their children to HIV in Kenya. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Aspirin could help reduce HIV infections in women

Research shows that Aspirin could reduce the number of HIV infections in women at high risk for HIV, such as Kenyan female sex workers.
For decades, doctors have been prescribing low-dose aspirin for healthy people over the age of 70. from shutterstock.com

Daily low-dose aspirin doesn’t reduce heart-attack risk in healthy people

Taking low-dose aspirin daily doesn’t delay the onset of disability in healthy older people. Nor does it prevent heart attack or stroke in those who hadn’t experienced either condition before.
Look for a warning on the box before you attempt to crush or chew tablets, or cut capsules open. Erin/Flickr

Health Check: is it OK to chew or crush your medicine?

Some people are incapable of swallowing tablets because of physical or psychological reasons. What should they do when the doctor prescribes a drug that comes in tablet form?
Recent research suggests that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may help prevent certain skin cancers. Nicolas Lannuzel/Flickr

Common painkillers could decrease skin cancer risk

Common over-the-counter painkillers, such as ibuprofen and aspirin, can decrease risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma, according to a study published today in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology…
The study found that the longer women take aspirin, the lower the risk of melanoma skin cancer. http://www.flickr.com/photos/curtisperry

Aspirin linked to lower skin cancer risk in women

Women who use aspirin for five or more years have a 30% lower risk of developing melanoma skin cancer than women who don’t take aspirin, a new study has found. Previous studies have linked aspirin with…
Aspirin was linked to age-related macular degeneration, the study found. http://www.flickr.com/photos/danielmorris

Long term aspirin users at higher risk of blindness in old age

Long term aspirin users may be at a higher risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, which can cause blindness in old age, a new study has found. The study, led by the University of Sydney and…
The evidence for taking aspirin daily as a cancer preventative is not considered sufficiently robust. Marius Kallhardt

Humble hero or hidden villain? The ongoing story of aspirin’s powers

The humble aspirin has a remarkable history dating back to ancient Egyptian times when the bark of weeping willow (which contains salicin from which the aspirin formulation is derived) was found to have…

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