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Articles on Brain

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Brain-computer interfaces raise many ethical questions about how and whether they should be used for certain applications. Wenjin Chen/DigitalVision Vectors via Getty Images

Brain-computer interfaces could allow soldiers to control weapons with their thoughts and turn off their fear – but the ethics of neurotechnology lags behind the science

From warfare to entertainment and VR, brain-computer interface development has extended beyond prosthetics for patients with disabilities. Missing is full ethical consideration of the consequences.
Fathers’ brains adjust their structure and function to parenthood. María Paternina-Die

Fatherhood changes men’s brains, according to before-and-after MRI scans

Neuroscientists know that pregnant mothers’ brains change in ways that appear to help with caring for a baby. Now researchers have identified changes in new fathers’ brains, too.
Electronic devices are not, in and of themselves, a source of visual problems. Using these devices inappropriately can interfere with the natural development of the eye, as well as reading and learning skills. Shutterstock

Development of vision in early childhood: No screens before age two

The impact of using electronic devices is critical during the first years of life, both visually and on the cognitive and social development of the child.
Concussion doesn’t just happen in sports or only in teens and young adults; it affects people of all ages and backgrounds. (Shutterstock)

Concussion is more than sports injuries: Who’s at risk and how Canadian researchers are seeking better diagnostics and treatments

Canadian researchers are exploring unanswered questions about concussion: How to diagnose it accurately and quickly, how to predict outcomes and promote recovery, and how to prevent it altogether.
The U.S. BRAIN Initiative seeks to elucidate the connection between brain structure and function. Science Photo Library - PASIEKA/Brand X Pictures via Getty Images

Illuminating the brain one neuron and synapse at a time – 5 essential reads about how researchers are using new tools to map its structure and function

From figuring out where memories are stored to how sensory information translates to behavior, new technologies are helping neuroscientists better understand how the brain works.
Epilepsy is characterized by spontaneous and recurrent seizures, often triggered by stress or visual stimuli. (Shutterstock)

What epilepsy teaches us about diversity and resilience

Our team studied the activity of neurons in people with epilepsy. Neurons in the brain regions responsible for triggering seizures were much less diverse.

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