Menu Close

Articles on Friday essay

Displaying 1 - 20 of 235 articles

Mary Elizabeth Shutler in Vanuatu, in the1960s. Permitted to join the first archaeological expedition to New Caledonia in 1952 as a ‘voluntary assistant’, she was the only French speaker and chief interlocuter with the Kanak people. Family archives, reproduced with the kind authorisation of John Shutler & Susan Arter.

Friday essay: invisible no more – putting the first women archaeologists of the Pacific back on the map

‘Wives’, volunteers, assistants: the vital contribution of women archaeologists has long been underplayed, if not erased. A new project uncovers trailblazers in the Pacific.
Hoda Afshar’s exhibition Remain, The Substation, Melbourne, 2019. Photograph by Leela Schauble. Courtesy the artist and The Substation, Melbourne

Friday essay: 10 photography exhibitions that defined Australia

From the Intercolonial Exhibition in 1866 to a landmark show, a century later, in which Aboriginal photographers displayed their works, photography has shaped the nation.
Paula Hawkins’ The Girl on the Train has sold 23 million copies, and the film adaptation was a box office smash. DreamWorks Pictures/Universal Pictures via AP

Friday essay: beyond ‘girl gone mad melodrama’ — reframing female anger in psychological thrillers

There’s something disturbing about a story tracking a character’s mental decline for thrills. Happily, Paula Hawkins’ new novel, A Slow Fire Burning, joins a genre of books bucking this trend.
A slide by Gordon H. Woodhouse to accompany a 1901 lecture by his father Clarence entitled ‘exploration and development of Australia’. State Library of Victoria

Friday essay: Our utopia … careful what you wish for

Exclusion has been central to utopian ideas of Australia since before Federation. It still lingers. To progress in this climate-challenged century, Australia’s foundational wrongs must be righted.
St Kitts-born Archibald Burt pictured beside sugar cane growing in his Perth garden in 1862. Burt, a former slave owner, became chief justice of Western Australia. State Library of Western Australia 6923B/182

Friday essay: beyond ‘statue shaming’ — grappling with Australia’s legacies of slavery

When Britain legislated to abolish slavery in 1833, some former slave owners moved to the Australasian colonies. New research traces this movement of people, money and ideologies.
Could music provide an unlikely source of inspiration for improving human relationships with forests? Paul Jones / UOW Media

Friday essay: the guitar industry’s hidden environmental problem — and the people trying to fix it

Following scandals over illegal logging, and with an appetite for rare, old-growth wood, the guitar industry is rethinking its environmental footprint. Australian companies are leading the way.

Top contributors

More