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American University School of Communication

Based in Washington, D.C., the American University School of Communication offers a comprehensive approach to media practice, production and research, with bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral and certificate programs in Communication Studies, Film and Media Arts, Games, Journalism, and Public Communication.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 38 articles

Pollsters predicted a much higher vote for Joe Biden, including in Florida, where workers at the Pinellas County Supervisor of Elections Office in Largo process voters’ ballots on Nov. 3. Octavio Jones/Getty Images

In its troubled hour, polling could use an irreverent figure to reset expectations

Pollster Bud Roper once said of his field that "a good deal more than half is art and ... less than half is science." After the 2020 polls got a lot wrong, is it time for more candor from pollsters?
Watching the presidential election returns on election night in retirement community of The Villages, Florida. Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images

An embarrassing failure for election pollsters

Polls predicted a 'blue wave' that didn't materialize.
Voters wait to cast their ballots Tuesday at Johnston Elementary School in the Wilkinsburg neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

A Q&A with a historian of presidential polls

An expert on the history of polling has a first take on how pollsters did this year.
Supporters on election night 2016 at a Hillary Clinton party, when it became clear poll-based forecasts had been off target. Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Why Americans are so enamored with election polls

Polling is an imperfect attempt at providing insight and explanation. But the public's desire for insight and explanation about elections never ends, so polls endure despite their flaws and failures.
Will Trump voters – like these at a rally, waving goodbye to him as he leaves – defy the polls and send him back to the White House? Olivier Touron/AFP/Getty Images

How might the campaign’s endgame be disrupted? Here are five scenarios, drawn from the history of election polling

Polling shows Joe Biden with a large lead over Donald Trump nationally in the presidential race. But there are many ways that presidential race polling has gone wrong in the past, and could do so now.
Legendary New York City columnist Jimmy Breslin, right, ready to do shoe-leather journalistic research in a bar, said preelection polls were “monstrous frauds.” Michael Brennan/Getty Images

When noted journalists bashed political polls as nothing more than ‘a fragmentary snapshot’ of a moment in time

There was a time when well-known journalists resented preelection polls and didn’t mind saying so. One even said he felt “secret glee and relief when the polls go wrong.” Why did they feel this way?
Twitter mediates so much in the public sphere that weak points at the company are weak points in society. NurPhoto via Getty Images

Twitter hack exposes broader threat to democracy and society

Hackers demonstrated they can take over Twitter's technology infrastructure, a brazen move that hints at how such an attack could destabilize society.
President John F. Kennnedy personally bid the first Peace Corps volunteers farewell. AP Photo/William J. Smith

How the US government sold the Peace Corps to the American public

The agency's earliest ad campaigns emphasized youthful idealism, patriotism and travel opportunities. That was an easier sell than urging Americans to enlist in an anti-communist operation.
The pandemic is increasing society’s reliance on digital connections. MR.Cole_Photographer/Moment via Getty Images

Society’s dependence on the internet: 5 cyber issues the coronavirus lays bare

Much of the world is moving online in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Society's newly increased dependence on the internet is bringing the need for good cyber policy into sharp relief.
Elements of smart homes, including thermostats, may be vulnerable to hackers. Ann Hermes/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images

‘Internet of things’ could be an unseen threat to elections

Co-opting internet-connected devices could disrupt transportation systems on Election Day, stymie political campaigns, or help make information warfare more credible.
President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally on Jan. 28 in Wildwood, New Jersey. AP Photo/Mel Evans

Trump supporters have little trust in societal institutions

In a survey, Trump supporters showed the lowest faith in the Supreme Court, the federal government, the media and other pillars of society.
Robert Plant, the lead singer of Led Zeppelin, performs in Hamburg, Germany in 1973. Heinrich Klaffs

Plagiarists or innovators? The Led Zeppelin paradox endures

How can a band so slavishly derivative – and sometimes downright plagiaristic – be also considered radically innovative and influential?
Apakah orang-orang ini menderita gangguan - atau hanya bersenang-senang? AP Photo/Kamil Zihnioglu

Apakah rekreasi dan apakah kecanduan permainan digital di abad ke-21

Hanya karena seseorang menikmati aktivitas rekreasional bukan berarti mereka kecanduan terhadap hal tersebut, meskipun mereka menghabiskan waktu yang banyak untuk melakukannya.
H.F. ‘Gerry’ Lenfest, left, donated tens of millions of dollars to sustain Philadelphia’s newspapers. AP Photo/Rich Schultz

The pace of nonprofit media growth is picking up

Without credible news and information, a healthy democracy is not possible.

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