Case Western Reserve University

Case Western Reserve was originally founded in 1826. What began as two separate institutions — Case Institute of Technology and Western Reserve College — federated in 1967 to form Case Western Reserve University, which immediately became one of the country’s leading research institutions.

Case Western Reserve supports about 100 designated academic and research centers. The eight schools and college offer close to 200 top-ranked undergraduate, graduate and professional programs that range from arts, law and humanities to engineering and medicine.

Case Western Reserve counts 15 Nobel laureates (including the first American scientist to receive the prize) among our current and former faculty and alumni.

About 10,000 students — 40 percent undergraduate — are enrolled at the university, representing all 50 states and more than 100 countries.

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The pope can order religious investigations that can allow the Vatican to swiftly take action. Giuseppe Lami/Pool Photo via AP

Catholic investigations are still shrouded in secrecy

Early Christians were urged to 'supervise' one another. In the present times, that theology is often used by the Vatican for a religious investigation a known as the apostolic visitation.
As the U.K. leaves the European Union, what awaits Prime Minister Boris Johnson? Isabel Infantes/AFP via Getty Images

Britain is about to leave the EU – what’s next?

People who support Brexit want different results from the UK's departure from the EU – and they can't all get what they want.
Speciality drug prices are so high priced that many patients skip or ration them. Ravital/Shutterstock.com

High-priced specialty drugs: Exposing the flaws in the system

High prescription drug costs are a widespread concern for consumers and policymakers. For patients who need specialty drugs, though, the problem is even worse, with no relief in sight.
Flag of Kurdistan on military uniform. Bumble Dee/Shutterstock.com

Why there is no Kurdish nation

Despite many attempts, the Kurds have never won and kept their own nation -- though, after World War I, they came close.
Hitler y Mussolini en Munich, Alemania, el 18 de junio de 1940. Everett Historical / Shutterstock

La normalización del fascismo

En los años 20 y principios de los 30, sectores de la prensa estadounidense normalizaron el ascenso del fascismo.
Physician burnout can have an impact on both the doctors and their patients. Jamesboy Nuchaikong/shutterstock.com

Physician burnout: Why legal and regulatory systems may need to step in

Doctor depression, burnout and suicide have been rising for some time, and overwork was considered the norm. A health care lawyer explains why the legal and regulatory systems must intervene.
Dr. Paul Davis shows President Trump a surprise $17,000 medical bill his daughter received, while Trump spoke to reporters about surprise medical bills at the White House on May 9, 2019. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Health care price transparency: Fool’s gold, or real money in your pocket?

President Trump has been backing transparency in hospital pricing so that consumers can compare prices. But will that help when the real deals are done in secret?
U.S. President Donald Trump. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

The 25th Amendment wouldn’t work to dump Trump

Those who want President Trump out of office should forget about the 25th Amendment; it won’t work as they hope or believe. The amendment is a complex law that – by design – is very hard to use.
A waxwork of Captain America on display at Madame Tussauds in Bangkok, Thailand. Nuamfolio/Shutterstock.com

Doping soldiers so they fight better – is it ethical?

Doping is condemned in sports. But what about in the military? Should soldiers be allowed or even encouraged to take drugs that make them superior fighters and more likely to complete a mission?
Chen Yabian, 74, of Hainan Province, southern China, testifies during the International Symposium on Chinese ‘Comfort Women’ in 2000 in Shanghai that she was 14 when Japanese Imperial Army soldiers forced her to work as a sex slave during the war. AP/Eugene Hoshiko

Recent attempts at reparations show that World War II is not over

US agreements with Germany, France, Switzerland and Austria provide reparations to WWII victims. But an international law scholar writes that the US has failed to address war crimes in Asia.

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