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Mississippi State University

Mississippi State University is a comprehensive, doctoral-degree-granting university offering to a diverse and capable student body a wide range of opportunities and challenges for learning and growth; to the world of knowledge, vigorous and expanding contributions in research, discovery, and application; and to the State and its people in every region, a variety of expert services.

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Voting is well underway in many states. Here, an early voting station in Lincoln, R.I., Oct. 13, 2020. Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Obstacles to voting: 6 essential reads on the challenges of election 2020

Experts explain five big threats to this year's election, from Russian interference to voter intimidation at the polls – plus some tips to make sure every vote is counted.
George Aubert rescues one of his chickens from rising floodwaters caused by Hurricane Matthew in Fair Bluff, North Carolina, in 2016. Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Worsening hurricane season threatens billions of chickens

More than half the US production of broiler chickens is in states along the coast frequently struck by hurricanes.
When Hurricane Dorian, seen here from the International Space Station, stalled over the Bahamas in September 2019, its winds, rain and storm surge devastated the islands. NASA

What makes hurricanes stall, and why is that so hard to forecast?

Hurricane stalling has become common over the past half-century, and their average forward speed has also slowed.
Encouraging students at the University of Colorado, Boulder, to vote in the midterm elections, Nov. 6, 2018. Jason Connolly/AFP via Getty Images

Want the youth vote? Some college students are still up for grabs in November

Researchers examined the voting behavior of 5,762 students at 120 colleges and universities. Two groups stood out as an untapped electoral resource – if the candidates can turn out Gen Z.
With its largely white and older workers, this poll site in Maine is typical of poll sites across the U.S. Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Poll workers on Election Day will be younger – and probably more diverse – due to COVID-19

An army of mostly older, white volunteers run America's voting sites. They're reluctant to work during a pandemic. So new recruits are signing up to run the polls, for better and for worse.
Patrons eat outside at a small cafe in West Reading, Pennsylvania, as the community begins to reopen. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

How small towns are responding to the global pandemic

Local leaders and business owners have had to get creative to help their residents stay healthy and keep community economies going.
Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators shooting tear gas next to St. John’s Episcopal Church outside of the White House, June 1, 2020 in Washington D.C., during a protest over the death of George Floyd. JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP via Getty Images

What is tear gas?

The chemical weapon, tear gas, was used in Washington DC, Los Angeles, Orlando and several other cities to control crowds protesting the death of George Floyd. But what is it? Does it cause harm?
How many times a day do you use soap? Paul Linse/The Image Bank via Getty Images

The dirty history of soap

With hand-washing top of mind, soap is an integral part of keeping clean. But people through the ages relied on earlier forms of soap more for cleaning objects than for personal hygiene.
Carbonation and flavors are all that go into most seltzers. stockcam/E+ via Getty Images

Is seltzer water healthy?

Bubbly waters are becoming increasingly popular. While these carbonated, sometimes flavored beverages might cause slight harm to teeth, they are far better than soda. They might even be good for you.
When you share information online, do it responsibly. Sitthiphong/Getty Images

10 ways to spot online misinformation

Here's what to watch out for, so you can protect yourself – and your social circles – from lies, half-truths and misleading spins on current events.
To understand the effects of a big die-off, researchers set up experiments with wild boar carcasses. Brandon Barton, Mississippi State University

Rotting feral pig carcasses teach scientists what happens when tons of animals die all at once, as in Australia’s bushfires

Death is a natural part of ecosystems. But it's unusual for a large number of animals to all die at once. Researchers are investigating how a mass mortality event affects what's left afterwards.

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