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Tufts University

Founded in 1852, Tufts University is a nationally ranked, student-centered research university with a global perspective, a thriving life sciences enterprise and deep scholarship in the arts and humanities.

Tufts, with undergraduate, graduate and professional programs, is both a research university and a liberal arts college – a unique combination that attracts students, faculty and staff who thrive in our environment of curiosity, creativity and engagement.

Tufts has campuses in Boston, Medford/Somerville and Grafton, Massachusetts, and a European Center in Talloires, France, and the School of Arts and Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, School of Engineering, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, Fletcher School, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA), School of Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and the Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life.

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Around the world 55 million people live with dementia. Researchers are still looking for answers on what causes it and how to treat it. Science Photo Library/Alamy Stock Photo

Unlocking new clues to how dementia and Alzheimer’s work in the brain – Uncharted Brain podcast series

The world’s longest running cohort study reveals risk factors for dementia. Families of athletes with early-onset dementia tell their stories. Could viruses cause Alzheimer’s? Listen to the Uncharted Brain: Decoding Dementia podcast series.
Los países en desarrollo piden más financiación y cambios en el Banco Mundial. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

Cuatro señales de progreso en la cumbre de la ONU sobre el cambio climático

Los temas más importantes de la COP27 tienen que ver con la financiación de los países con bajos ingresos afectados por el cambio climático. Una antigua directiva del Banco Mundial describe algunos signos prometedores que ha empezado a ver.
Developing countries are calling for more funding and for changes at the World Bank. Sean Gallup/Getty Images

4 signs of progress at the UN climate change summit

The biggest issues at COP27 involve financing for low-income countries hit hard by climate change. A former World Bank official describes some promising signs she’s starting to see.
The Supreme Court is deciding a case on whether, and how, universities may consider an applicant’s race when making admissions decisions. AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

What is affirmative action, anyway? 4 essential reads

Scholars explain what affirmative action is – and isn’t – as well as what its effects are, and why, among others, the military has supported it for decades.
U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken, left, stands near a damaged residential building in Irpin, Ukraine, on Sept. 8, 2022. Genya Savilov/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

The US isn’t at war with Russia, technically – but its support for Ukraine offers a classic case of a proxy war

Giving Ukraine large amounts of money while not actually declaring war on Russia has various benefits for the US and other countries. Chiefly, it could protect US soldiers and civilians.
Kim Jong Un remains focused on reunifying Korea – on his terms. Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images

It’s time to take Kim Jong Un and his nuclear threats seriously

A recent barrage of nuclear-capable missile tests and a change in law setting out the conditions for a nuclear strike show that North Korea’s leader is intent on reunification on his terms.
The new Baltic Pipe natural gas pipeline connects Norwegian natural gas fields in the North Sea with Denmark and Poland, offering an alternative to Russian gas. Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Russia’s energy war: Putin’s unpredictable actions and looming sanctions could further disrupt oil and gas markets

Russian President Vladimir Putin has not hesitated to use energy as a weapon. An expert on global energy markets analyzes what could come next.

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