University of Pittsburgh

The University of Pittsburgh is a state-related research university located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. It was founded on the edge of the American frontier as the Pittsburgh Academy in 1787, and evolved into the Western University of Pennsylvania by alteration of its charter in 1819. After surviving two devastating fires and various relocations within the area, the school moved to its current location in the Oakland neighborhood of the city and was renamed to the University of Pittsburgh in 1908. For most of its history Pitt was a private institution, until it became part of the Commonwealth System of Higher Education in 1966.

The university comprises 17 undergraduate and graduate schools and colleges located at its urban Pittsburgh campus, home to the university’s central administration and 28,766 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. The university also includes four additional undergraduate schools located at campuses within Western Pennsylvania: Bradford, Greensburg, Johnstown, and Titusville. The 132-acre Pittsburgh campus comprises multiple historic buildings of the Schenley Farms Historic District, most notably its 42-story gothic revival centerpiece, the Cathedral of Learning. The campus is situated adjacent to the flagship medical facilities of its closely affiliated University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), as well as the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Schenley Park, and Carnegie Mellon University.

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A woman with diabetes monitors her glycemia on the eighth day of a strict lockdown in France aimed at curbing the spread of COVID-19. FRANCK FIFE/AFP via Getty Images

Blood sugar levels may influence vulnerability to coronavirus, and controlling them through conventional means might be protective

What does high blood sugar have to do with vulnerability to COVID-19? And is there a role for the controversial drug hydroxychloroquine in lowering blood sugar in COVID-19 patients?
When leaders make public health decisions, such as how long social distancing should be maintained to reduce the coronavirus death toll, they often use mathematical models. The numbers aren’t always as simple as they seem. Alex Brandon/AP

Why coronavirus death rates can’t be summed up in one simple number

A lot of numbers are being tossed around about COVID-19 and what to expect in the future. They're being used to make critical public health decisions, but they aren't as simple as they appear.
An emergency polio ward in Boston in 1955 equipped with iron lungs. These pressurized respirators acted as breathing muscles for polio victims, often children, who were paralyzed. www.apimages.com

The deadly polio epidemic and why it matters for coronavirus

Polio was nearly eradicated with the Salk vaccine in 1955. At the time, little was known about this mysterious disease that paralyzed and sometimes killed young children.
Would you buy medicine from this man? Carol M. Highsmith/Wikimedia Commons

Why do people believe con artists?

People everywhere have always had a sweet tooth for the unreal, enthralled by what should be taken as too good to be true. Why do people ignore the obvious and believe the bizarre?
Joaquin Phoenix won the award for outstanding performance by a male actor in a leading role for ‘Joker’ at the 26th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards. Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

Joaquin Phoenix’s lips mocked – here’s what everyone should know about cleft lip

After a talk show host mocked Joaquin Phoenix for what she assumed was a cleft lip, the experts address what causes this most common of birth defects.

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