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University of Pittsburgh

The University of Pittsburgh is a state-related research university located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. It was founded on the edge of the American frontier as the Pittsburgh Academy in 1787, and evolved into the Western University of Pennsylvania by alteration of its charter in 1819. After surviving two devastating fires and various relocations within the area, the school moved to its current location in the Oakland neighborhood of the city and was renamed to the University of Pittsburgh in 1908. For most of its history Pitt was a private institution, until it became part of the Commonwealth System of Higher Education in 1966.

The university comprises 17 undergraduate and graduate schools and colleges located at its urban Pittsburgh campus, home to the university’s central administration and 28,766 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. The university also includes four additional undergraduate schools located at campuses within Western Pennsylvania: Bradford, Greensburg, Johnstown, and Titusville. The 132-acre Pittsburgh campus comprises multiple historic buildings of the Schenley Farms Historic District, most notably its 42-story gothic revival centerpiece, the Cathedral of Learning. The campus is situated adjacent to the flagship medical facilities of its closely affiliated University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), as well as the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Schenley Park, and Carnegie Mellon University.

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Sequencing the genetic code of virus samples taken from COVID-19 patients reveals how SARS-CoV-2 is spreading and changing. Nate Langer/UPMC

Genomic surveillance: What it is and why we need more of it to track coronavirus variants and help end the COVID-19 pandemic

The US lags in testing coronavirus samples from COVID-19 patients, which can help track the spread of the virus and the emergence of new variants. But labs are ramping up this crucial surveillance.
Nuevos tratamientos para el COVID-19 se usan en distintas fases de la enfermedad, incluso hay tratamientos que pueden mantenerte fuera del hospital. Juan Monino via Getty Images

6 tratamientos que reciben pacientes COVID para sobrevivir, de anticuerpos a remdesivir

Todavía no existe una cura rápida, pero varios tratamientos están ayudando a los pacientes a sobrevivir al COVID-19 y permanecer fuera del hospital por completo.
New treatments target different stages of COVID-19, including before patients become sick enough to need a hospital. Juan Monino via Getty Images

6 COVID-19 treatments helping patients survive

A year after it became clear that COVID-19 was becoming a pandemic, there is still no cure, but doctors have several innovative treatments. Some are keeping patients out of the hospital entirely.
Trump put a portrait of Andrew Jackson in the Oval Office when he was president. Oliver Contreras-Pool/Getty Images

Trump wasn’t the first president to try to politicize the civil service – which remains at risk of returning to Jackson’s ‘spoils system’

For decades, presidents beginning with Andrew Jackson routinely replaced large swaths of the government workforce, often requiring them to pay fees to political parties in exchange for their jobs.
The older you get, the more slowly you heal, and there are a number of reasons why. Westend61 via Getty Images

Why do older people heal more slowly?

Healing is a complicated process. As people age, higher rates of disease and the fact that old cells lose the ability to divide slow this process down.
Election officials counting ballots at the Allegheny County elections warehouse Friday in Pittsburgh. Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

How votes are counted in Pennsylvania: Changing numbers are a sign of transparency, not fraud, during an ongoing process

As vote counts tick upward, people may have questions about why one candidate does better with mail-in votes or in-person ballots. Here are the answers, and an explanation of how the counting happens.
A sign keeping campaigners at a distance in the New Hampshire presidential primary election at the Town Hall in Chichester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016. Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

19th-century political parties kidnapped reluctant voters and printed their own ballots – and that’s why we’ve got laws regulating behavior at polling places

Laws that have long kept campaigners away from voters at polling places may not work in a world where a T-shirt symbol can be interpreted as campaigning.

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