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University of Pittsburgh

The University of Pittsburgh is a state-related research university located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. It was founded on the edge of the American frontier as the Pittsburgh Academy in 1787, and evolved into the Western University of Pennsylvania by alteration of its charter in 1819. After surviving two devastating fires and various relocations within the area, the school moved to its current location in the Oakland neighborhood of the city and was renamed to the University of Pittsburgh in 1908. For most of its history Pitt was a private institution, until it became part of the Commonwealth System of Higher Education in 1966.

The university comprises 17 undergraduate and graduate schools and colleges located at its urban Pittsburgh campus, home to the university’s central administration and 28,766 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. The university also includes four additional undergraduate schools located at campuses within Western Pennsylvania: Bradford, Greensburg, Johnstown, and Titusville. The 132-acre Pittsburgh campus comprises multiple historic buildings of the Schenley Farms Historic District, most notably its 42-story gothic revival centerpiece, the Cathedral of Learning. The campus is situated adjacent to the flagship medical facilities of its closely affiliated University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), as well as the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Schenley Park, and Carnegie Mellon University.

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A sign keeping campaigners at a distance in the New Hampshire presidential primary election at the Town Hall in Chichester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016. Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

19th-century political parties kidnapped reluctant voters and printed their own ballots – and that’s why we’ve got laws regulating behavior at polling places

Laws that have long kept campaigners away from voters at polling places may not work in a world where a T-shirt symbol can be interpreted as campaigning.
This antibody adopts a Y-shape. The arms of the Y make up the part of the antibody that binds to the target. ALFRED PASIEKA/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

One small part of a human antibody has the potential to work as a drug for both prevention and therapy of COVID-19

Antibodies are great for neutralizing viruses. But they are big and bulky. Antibody engineers are now creating smaller synthetic antibody-like molecules that may be better for fighting COVID-19.
Real estate prices are still related to a neighborhood’s racial composition, despite laws prohibiting the explicit consideration of race in appraisals. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Homes in Black and Latino neighborhoods still undervalued 50 years after US banned using race in real estate appraisals

New research shows homes in white areas have appreciated $200,000 more since 1980 than similar homes in nonwhite areas – a result of both old racist housing policies and modern real estate practices.
A humorous message about actor Tom Hanks at the closed Las Vegas Mini Grand Prix amid the coronavirus pandemic. Ethan Miller/Getty Images

How to use precision medicine to personalize COVID-19 treatment according to the patient’s genes

Precision medicine is often touted as the future of medicine. But so far, it hasn't been helpful in the war against COVID-19. Here is how it could be used to tease apart the nuances of the disease.
COVID-19 puede ser relacionado con problemas neurológicos en algunos pacientes que sufren una forma severa de la enfermedad. Ralwel / Getty Images

Síndrome de Guillain-Barré, raro trastorno neurológico relacionado con COVID-19

Científicos están investigando un posible vínculo entre el síndrome de Guillain-Barré y COVID-19 ya que este ha aparecido en pandemias anteriores con otros coronavirus como el SARS y el MERS.
COVID-19 has been linked to neurological problems in those with severe disease. Ralwel / Getty Images

Rare neurological disorder, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, linked to COVID-19

As if the symptoms of COVID-19 were not disturbing enough, physicians have noted a rare neurological condition that emerges during some severe cases of this viral infection.
Coughing, sneezing, talking and even just breathing can produce airborne particles that can spread SARS-CoV-2. Stanislaw Pytel/Digital Vision via Getty Images

People are getting sick from coronavirus spreading through the air – and that’s a big challenge for reopening

SARS-CoV-2 can be spread through the air. But just how much of a factor that is has been hard to determine. Recent evidence suggests it is common, posing problems as public places begin to reopen.
A protester holds up a sign with Breonna Taylor’s name. Taylor was killed by police officers on March 13. Brett Carlsen/Getty Images

A short history of black women and police violence

Young men make up the majority of black people killed by police in the US. That's fed a perception that black women are somehow shielded from the threat of police violence. They aren't.
A pandemic from a century ago doesn’t necessarily chart the course of the pandemic happening now. National Photo Company Collection/Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division/Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

Compare the flu pandemic of 1918 and COVID-19 with caution – the past is not a prediction

Differences in the viruses' biology and societal contexts mean there's no guarantee today's pandemic will mirror the 'waves' of infection a century ago.

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