University of Southern California – Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences is the heart of the University of Southern California. The largest, oldest and most diverse of USC’s 19 schools, USC Dornsife is composed of more than 30 departments and dozens of research centers and institutes. USC Dornsife is home to approximately 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and more than 750 faculty members with expertise across a spectrum of academic fields.

Our frontline scholars are working to find solutions to society’s toughest challenges by advancing human health, preserving and improving our environment, and strengthening our communities. Together, we are defining scholarship of consequence for the 21st century.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 36 articles

Some minorities are less likely to think that their college dreams could become a reality. AP Photo/Tim Boyd

Can people ‘like me’ go to college? Inequality and dreams of higher ed

While most Americans do aspire to higher education, college is not a reality for many. But why is the gap between hopes and reality larger for some? And how can we strive for equity?
Classified documents. www.shutterstock.com

What is classified information, and who gets to decide?

A professor who once held top secret clearance explains how levels of classification work and where handling sensitive information gets tricky.
A slave fortress in Cape Coast, Ghana. AP Photo/Clement N'Taye

A digital archive of slave voyages details the largest forced migration in history

An online database explores the nearly 36,000 slave voyages that occurred between 1514 and 1866.
Don’t underestimate what I get about the world around me. Baby image via www.shutterstock.com.

Children understand far more about other minds than long believed

A revolution in the tools and techniques developmental psychologists use to investigate kids' knowledge and capabilities is rewriting what we know about how and when children understand their world.
California Gov. Jerry Brown signs SB350 on Oct. 7, 2015. The bill calls for increasing the state’s renewable electricity use to 50 percent and doubling energy efficiency in existing buildings by 2030. AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes

Will blazing a low-carbon path pay off for California?

California has set ambitious goals for cutting carbon emissions and shifting to a clean energy economy. How will this strategy affect the state's huge economy? An economist weighs the evidence.
Who really are America’s irreligious? Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston

The changing nature of America’s irreligious explained

Americans are increasingly choosing not to identify with any religious tradition. But this group of irreligious people is a complex one – with different relationships to religion.
Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, U.S. President Barack Obama and U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon shake hands during a joint ratification of the Paris climate change agreement in eastern China’s Zhejiang province, Sept. 3, 2016. How Hwee Young/Pool Photo via AP

For China, climate change is no hoax – it’s a business and political opportunity

Although Donald Trump has called climate change a hoax invented by China, Chinese leaders believe cutting carbon emissions will generate economic and political payoffs at home and abroad.
Jennie A. Brownscombe’s ‘The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth’ (1914). Wikimedia Commons

The two men who almost derailed New England’s first colonies

The Pilgrims were thankful for finally being able to vanquish Thomas Morton and Ferdinando Gorges, who spent years trying to undermine the legal basis for settlements in Massachusetts and beyond.
Signs of satisfaction after Donald Trump was elected. Jeff Karoub/AP

Do conservatives value ‘moral purity’ more than liberals?

While research has long suggested that we like others who are like us, a new study offers insight into how we choose to support those who share our views of 'moral purity.' It may explain how we voted.
I can’t see you, you can’t see me. Child image via www.shutterstock.com.

Young children are terrible at hiding – psychologists have a new theory why

Little kids cover their own eyes and feel hidden, even if they're still fully visible. New research suggests this doesn't mean children can't understand others' perspectives, as had been assumed.

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