University of Southern California – Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences is the heart of the University of Southern California. The largest, oldest and most diverse of USC’s 19 schools, USC Dornsife is composed of more than 30 departments and dozens of research centers and institutes. USC Dornsife is home to approximately 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and more than 750 faculty members with expertise across a spectrum of academic fields.

Our frontline scholars are working to find solutions to society’s toughest challenges by advancing human health, preserving and improving our environment, and strengthening our communities. Together, we are defining scholarship of consequence for the 21st century.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 93 articles

Johnson & Johnson was ordered to pay US$.4.69 billion in July, 2018 because it failed to warn customers that its baby powder contains asbestos. Matt Rourke/AP Photo

Why asbestos litigation won’t go away: Because asbestos won’t go away

Asbestos litigation is the number one source of tort claims in the US, with many people decrying the filing of so many claims. But there's a reason the claims persist. Asbestos isn't going anywhere.
King of a technologically advanced country, Black Panther is a scientific genius. © 2017 – Disney/Marvel Studios

‘Black Panther’ and its science role models inspire more than just movie awards

The film wowed critics and fans. But its hidden power may be black lead characters who are accomplished scientists – just the thing to help inspire future generations to follow in their footsteps.
Barry Jenkins’ ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ has been nominated for best adapted screenplay at the 91st Academy Awards. Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Oscars 2019: Beyond the stats, why diversity matters

Numbers alone don't relay the importance of people seeing their own experiences and lives mirrored in popular culture.
Protected time for new families could pay health dividends later. Jacob Lund/Shutterstock

Paid family leave is an investment in public health, not a handout

The transition to parenthood comes with plenty of stress. A psychology researcher suggests that paid family leave could help lift some of the burden – with positive health benefits down the road.
Wall construction along the U.S.-Mexico border in Sunland Park, New Mexico, in 2016. AP/Christian Torres

Immigration: How ancient Rome dealt with the Barbarians at the gate

As Congress and President Trump struggle to devise a coherent immigration policy along the US southern border, there are lessons from ancient history that could prove instructive.
A person dressed as Santa Claus waves as part of the festivities, during Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York. Andrew Kelly/Reuters

This Christmas tell your children the real Santa Claus story

Behind today's mythical Santa Claus from the North Pole, is a real saint – St. Nicholas. How he came to be today's gift-giving jolly figure from the North Pole is a fascinating story by itself.
President George H.W. Bush (right) fishing on the Kennebunk River in Maine, Aug. 27, 1990. AP Photo/Doug Mills

George H.W. Bush understood that markets and the environment weren’t enemies

George H.W. Bush, who pledged to be 'the environmental president,' took a market-based approach to pollution control that helped clear the air. Now some experts think it could work on climate change.
‘Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor’ by William Halsall (1882). Pilgrim Hall Museum

Why the Pilgrims were actually able to survive

The Pilgrims repeatedly thanked God for their good fortune. But without two earlier developments, the entire undertaking at New Plymouth would have likely failed.
A member of Veterans for Peace marches during the annual Veterans Day parade in New York, Nov. 11, 2017. AP/Andres Kudacki

Veterans have fought in wars – and fought against them

Veterans of past wars have long been at the forefront of peace advocacy in the United States.
A Halloween ghost. Werner Reischel/Flickr.com

Why believing in ghosts can make you a better person

Ghost stories are often about the departed seeking justice for an earthly wrong. Their sightings are a reminder that ethics and morality transcend our lives.
Trump, like Obama before him, has enjoyed a close relationship with Saudi Arabia’s royal family. AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Saudi Arabia is a repressive regime – and so are a lot of US allies

Critics say Trump's defense of Saudi Arabia in the Khashoggi affair betrays American values. But many presidents have cozied up to dictators, ignoring human rights abuses to serve US interests.
Presidents Thomas Jefferson and Donald Trump. Wikipedia for Jefferson official portrait/REUTERS/Leah Millis for Trump photo

What Thomas Jefferson, Donald Trump and the American people think about freedom of the press

Americans are overwhelmingly committed to a free press and hostile to government restrictions, a new poll finds. But the country is divided on the meaning of President Trump's attacks on the press.
Levantarle el ánimo a otra persona pudiera ser también un gran estímulo para ti. Mohamed Nohassi/Unsplash, CC BY

¿Cómo apoyar a un hijo con depresión? Enséñale a ayudar a otros

Estudios psicológicos demuestran que el hecho de ayudar a otros nos hace sentir mejor. El hallazgo puede tener una importancia especial para los adolescentes deprimidos.
U.S. President Donald Trump during a campaign rally in Topeka, Kan., Oct. 6, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

From Caesar to Trump: Immunity is a hard thing to give up

US law says the president can't be indicted, an echo of ancient Roman law. The efforts Roman leader Julius Caesar made to maintain his immunity is a cautionary tale for America's political system.
Estatua de Cristóbal Colón en Columbus Circle, Nueva York. Shutterstock / Zoltan Tarlacz

Colón creía que en el Nuevo Mundo encontraría blemios y esciápodos en vez de personas

El viaje de Colón en 1492 fue realmente un viaje hacia lo desconocido. Siglos de historias legendarias le habían hecho creer que en las Indias le esperaban bestias extrañas y hombres monstruosos.
The statue of Christopher Columbus in Columbus Circle, New York City. Zoltan Tarlacz/Shutterstock.com

Columbus believed he would find ‘blemmyes’ and ‘sciapods’ – not people – in the New World

Christopher Columbus' 1492 voyage was really a journey into the unknown. Centuries of conventional wisdom had conditioned him to believe that bizarre beasts and 'monstrous men' would be awaiting him.

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