University of Southern California – Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences is the heart of the University of Southern California. The largest, oldest and most diverse of USC’s 19 schools, USC Dornsife is composed of more than 30 departments and dozens of research centers and institutes. USC Dornsife is home to approximately 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and more than 750 faculty members with expertise across a spectrum of academic fields.

Our frontline scholars are working to find solutions to society’s toughest challenges by advancing human health, preserving and improving our environment, and strengthening our communities. Together, we are defining scholarship of consequence for the 21st century.

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Displaying 21 - 40 of 136 articles

President Donald Trump waves as he boards Air Force One, June 6, 2019. AP/Alex Brandon

Impeachment is better than exile

When the founders wrote the Constitution, they had to devise a punishment fitting for a civil servant's impeachment. One possible punishment: banishment from the community.
Energy Secretary Rick Perry speaks during an event about the environment at the White House on July 8, 2019, as President Trump looks on. AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Rick Perry’s belief that Trump was chosen by God is shared by many in a fast-growing Christian movement

A Christian movement led by independent religious entrepreneurs, often referred to as 'apostles,' is changing the religious landscape of the US.
Even if the thought counts, the effort might not be worth it. karen roach/Shutterstock.com

Calling donors to thank them doesn’t make them more likely to give again

Like any personal touch, there's a chance this common fundraising step makes people feel warm and fuzzy inside. But a five-year research project found that it doesn't make donors more generous.
A looted Jewish shop in Aachen, Germany on the day after Kristallnacht, Nov. 10, 1938. Wolf Gruner and Armin Nolzen (eds.). 'Bürokratien: Initiative und Effizienz,' Berlin, 2001.

The forgotten mass destruction of Jewish homes during ‘Kristallnacht’

Most histories highlight the shattered storefronts and synagogues set aflame. But it was the systematic ransacking of Jewish homes that extracted the greatest toll.
It’s all connected. Vasin Lee/Shutterstock

Why ‘acting locally’ is impossible in an interconnected world

What can we do as individuals to help save the planet? Acting locally is satisfying because we can see the results, but a geographer argues that large-scale solutions often make the most difference.
Revelers dressed as Catrina, an iconic Day of the Dead skeleton, at a holiday parade in Mexico City, Oct. 21, 2018. Reuters/Andres Stapff

Day of the Dead: From Aztec goddess worship to modern Mexican celebration

It may sound like a solemn affair, but the Day of the Dead – which blends indigenous and Catholic ritual – is a convivial celebration that allows Mexicans to reconnect with deceased loved ones.
African Americans have worse health outcomes and die earlier than whites. Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

Study: Racism shortens lives and hurts health of blacks by promoting genes that lead to inflammation and illness

The recent death of Elijah Cummings at age 68 underscores a disturbing statistic: black men die, on average, five years younger than white men. A study shows racism's effects on gene activity.
Visitors walk through Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama’s installation ‘Fireflies on the Water.’ maurizio mucciola/flickr

In dandelions and fireflies, artists try to make sense of climate change

Images of wildfires are powerful, but can make climate catastrophe seem like something spectacular and distant. So some artists are focusing on the plants and bugs in our immediate surroundings.
With giant Saturn hanging in the blackness and sheltering Cassini from the Sun’s blinding glare, the spacecraft viewed the rings as never before. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

A brief astronomical history of Saturn’s amazing rings

Although the rings of Saturn may look like a permanent fixture of the planet, they are ever-changing. New analyses of the rings reveal how and when they were made, from what and whether they'll last.
Is a bottle of morning milk at night the equivalent of turning on all the lights at bedtime? comzeal images/Shutterstock.com

Human breast milk may help babies tell time via circadian signals from mom

Breast milk contains ingredients in concentrations that change over the course of the day. Researchers think milk is chrononutrition, carrying molecular messages to help set a baby's internal clock.
Mars should be the next destination for humankind. Gorodenkoff/Shutterstock.com

Young Americans deserve a 21st-century Moonshot to Mars

Americans need a new multi-decade Moonshot that will inspire several generations to shoot for the stars and pursue careers in space engineering and exploration.
President Harry S Truman established the initial version of the National Intelligence Council. AP Photo

An invisible government agency produces crucial national security intelligence, but is anyone listening?

The National Intelligence Council works inside government but is little understood outside. Yet it has helped respond to almost all the major foreign policy challenges of the last 40 years.
Dalam aksi langsung ‘Aladdin,’ Mena Massoud membintangi Aladdin, sementara Will Smith berperan sebagai Jin. Daniel Smith/Walt Disney Pictures

Bagaimana film ‘Aladdin’ yang baru melawan stereotip Hollywood

Walau 'Aladdin' 2019 adalah peningkatan besar dari versi 1992, ternyata ia masih mendaur ulang beberapa kiasan lama.
More than 40 lynchings have been documented in Maryland. Shutterstock

Maryland has created a truth commission on lynchings – can it deliver?

The first truth commission to research lynchings has been established in Maryland. It has the potential to educate the public about and support racial reconciliation. But it also faces obstacles.
Droplets rising from the Champagne vent on the ocean floor in the Mariana Islands. Fluids venting from the site contain dissolved carbon dioxide. NOAA Ocean Explorer

Deep sea carbon reservoirs once superheated the Earth – could it happen again?

Thousands of years ago, carbon gases trapped on the seafloor escaped, causing drastic warming that helped end the last ice age. A scientist says climate change could cause this process to repeat.

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