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USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences is the heart of the University of Southern California. The largest, oldest and most diverse of USC’s 19 schools, USC Dornsife is composed of more than 30 departments and dozens of research centers and institutes. USC Dornsife is home to approximately 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and more than 750 faculty members with expertise across a spectrum of academic fields.

Our frontline scholars are working to find solutions to society’s toughest challenges by advancing human health, preserving and improving our environment, and strengthening our communities. Together, we are defining scholarship of consequence for the 21st century.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 173 articles

On Sept. 17, 2001, Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta, left, met with President George W. Bush and others. Greg Mathieson/Mai/Getty Images

How memories of Japanese American imprisonment during WWII guided the US response to 9/11

In the wake of 9/11, some called for rounding up whole groups of people viewed as potential threats to the nation. But Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta knew the U.S. had done that before.
A student’s drawings of a scientist upon starting and after completing the Young Scientists Program. USC Young Scientists Program

Sending science majors into elementary schools helps Latino and Black students realize scientists can look like them

After completing a hands-on STEM program, students in Los Angeles were more likely to draw scientists as people of color or themselves instead of stereotypical white men in lab coats.
Isolation and other pandemic stresses can harm pregnant women’s mental health, with effects on their babies too. Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Pregnancy during COVID-19 lockdown: How the pandemic has affected new mothers

Pregnant women’s experiences can affect their babies’ health, even into adulthood. Researchers know societywide stresses can lead to these long-term consequences – and the pandemic likely fits the bill.
The maker of Bud Light says it will give all Americans over 21 a free beer if the U.S. reaches Biden’s 70% vaccination goal. Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Free beer, doughnuts and a $1 million lottery – how vaccine incentives and other behavioral tools are helping the US reach herd immunity

Governments and companies are using incentives in hopes of getting more Americans to get a COVID-19 shot. A behavioral economist explains how they work.
Consumer decisions could play a critical role in dealing with climate change. A study gauging perceptions was published May 13, 2021. FotographiaBasica via Getty Images

Using captured CO₂ in everyday products could help fight climate change, but will consumers want them?

A large-scale survey asked people exactly that. One use of recycled carbon dioxide stood out.
Giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) is a potential energy crop. Linking Tourism & Conservation/Flickr

Move over, corn and soybeans: The next biofuel source could be giant sea kelp

Making biofuels from crops grown on land poses trade-offs between food and fuel. A new study looks offshore.
Lisa Nhan puts on a musical performance with crystal bowls in Los Angeles on Feb. 20 as part of an event to call attention to anti-Asian violence and racist attitudes. AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes

Asian Americans top target for threats and harassment during pandemic

Since the beginning of the pandemic, hate crimes targeting Asian Americans have gotten increased media and public attention. New data shows these events are in fact happening more often.
Medieval Christians believed that heaven was a realm filled with dancing. Italian painter Fra Angelico’s ‘Last Judgment’ showing dancing angels. Fra Angelico's Last Judgment/Wikimedia

Why Christianity put away its dancing shoes – only to find them again centuries later

Despite opposition from the early church, dance was an integral part of Christian devotion for many centuries before falling out of favor.
A demonstrator dressed as Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman with blood on his hands protests outside the Saudi Embassy in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 8, 2018. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Why repressive Saudi Arabia remains a US ally

Saudi’s crown prince approved the killing and dismemberment of a Washington Post columnist in 2018, the Biden administration says. So how can the US still see the Saudis as good partners?

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