Articles on Air pollution

Displaying 1 - 20 of 248 articles

Situated on a plateau and surrounded by mountains, Mexico City – seen here in a haze on May 20, 2018 – is a ‘bowl’ that traps smog and dust. AP Photo/Marco Ugarte

Mexico City buried its rivers to prevent disease and unwittingly created a dry, polluted city where COVID-19 now thrives

The Aztecs had a shining city on a lake, with canals, causeways and aqueducts – until the Spanish came. Mexico City is still suffering the consequences of their bad public health decisions.
Much of India experiences both extreme heat and extreme air pollution, as seen in this photo of the Akshardham Hindu temple. Days with both are going to increase. Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images

Days with both extreme heat and extreme air pollution are becoming more common – which can’t be a good thing for global health

In South Asia, days with both extreme heat and extreme pollution are expected to increase 175% by 2050. Separately, the health effects are bad; together they will likely be worse.
Surfers walk on the beach while the fire continues to blaze on the mountains behind them in 2015 in Cape Town, South Africa. Shelley Christians/The Times/Gallo Images/Getty Images

Air pollution and temperature: bad for your heart and blood vessels

Until now, the interaction of temperature and air pollution and its contribution to these diseases hasn't been studied conclusively in South Africa - or anywhere on the African continent.
Artisanal small-scale gold mining polluted this stream and deforested sections of the Madre de Dios area of Peru. Mario Tama/Getty Images

Gold rush, mercury legacy: Small-scale mining for gold has produced long-lasting toxic pollution, from 1860s California to modern Peru

Small-scale gold mining operations in developing countries are major sources of toxic mercury pollution, using techniques that haven't changed much since the California Gold Rush 150 years ago.
Reducing fine particle air pollution from petrochemical complexes, like this one near the Houston Ship Channel in Texas, is a low-cost way to lower air pollution mortality. AP Photo/David J. Phillip

Air pollution kills thousands of Americans every year – here’s a low-cost strategy to reduce the toll

A new study takes an innovative approach to reducing fine particle air pollution and spotlights key sources: factories that burn coal and oil, petrochemical plants and burning wood for home heating.

Top contributors

More