Menu Close

Articles on Implicit bias

Displaying 1 - 20 of 29 articles

People in Zambia gather while awaiting food distribution in January 2020. Guillem Sartorio/AFP via Getty Images

Prejudice against people with darker skin may make donors less generous

Using a common tool for measuring subconscious stereotypes, a scholar assessed how bias against dark skin can influence an inclination to support a charity serving people in low-income countries.
People learn racism from the culture that surrounds them and media they consume, but that doesn’t need to be the end of the story. Gavriil Grigorov\TASS via Getty Images

American society teaches everyone to be racist – but you can rewrite subconscious stereotypes

If you’re American – regardless of the color of your skin – racism structures how you think. Changing the system should change these implicit biases.
Implicit bias training has become a lucrative business in recent years, but it doesn’t always deliver the expected results. (Dylan Gillis/Unsplash)

Beware of bias training: Addressing systemic racism is not an easy fix

Recent years have seen a rise in the number of businesses offering employees bias training. However, bias training is not a one-size-fits-all solution and unless tailored to specific contexts loses its value.
A woman walking with a white cane, which has become a symbol of independence for people who are blind. Akemaster/Shutterstock.com

Blind people have increased opportunities, but employers’ perceptions are still a barrier

People who are blind have made great strides in the workplace in the 55 years since the US first observed White Cane Day. Yet discrimination in employment still remains, two experts explain.
After 117 years, a third woman won a physics Nobel. Alexander Mahmoud, © Nobel Media AB 2018

Why don’t more women win science Nobels?

Progress has been made toward gender parity in science fields. But explicit and implicit barriers still hold women back from advancing in the same numbers as men to the upper reaches of STEM academia.
Research shows we all hold negative stereotypes; once we accept this, we can start to making positive change. Shutterstock

Let’s stop blaming ourselves for stigmatizing mental health

Awareness campaigns can only go so far to stopping the stigmatization of mental health. Change occurs once we stop shaming ourselves and others for our bias.
Mourners wait to attend the funeral of Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Virginia, Aug. 16, 2017 after Heyer was killed attending a rally to protest white nationalism. Julia Rendleman/AP Photo

Why bigotry is a public health problem

As death tolls rise from hate crimes, a psychiatrist wonders: Is it time to treat bigotry like a disease?
Only 3 percent of these prizes have gone to women since 1901. Reuters/Pawel Kopczynski

Why more women don’t win science Nobels

Progress has been made toward gender parity in science fields. But explicit and implicit barriers still hold women back from advancing in the same numbers as men to the upper reaches of STEM academia.
What are your in-groups and out-groups? ksenia_bravo/Shutterstock.com

Why our brains see the world as ‘us’ versus ‘them’

Our neural circuits lead us to find comfort in those like us and unease with those who differ, resulting in a battle between reward and distrust. But these brain connections aren't the end of the story.
Employees of Starbucks Coffee in the United States and Canada will receive “implicit bias” training. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graeme Roy

Starbucks and the impact of implicit bias training

Starbucks is implementing implicit bias training for its employees in the United States and Canada. Even though we are not aware implicit biases, they lead to discriminatory behaviours.
Protestors demonstrate inside a Philadelphia Starbucks, where two black men were arrested. REUTERS/Mark Makela

What’s unconscious bias training, and does it work?

Starbucks is giving this training to its employees, but it’s still so new that there's no standard format and little research yet on whether it's effective.
A diagram of where police shooting victim Stephon Clark was struck by bullets. AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

When police use force: 3 essential reads

Research on implicit bias, machismo and community relations may shed light on what drives police-citizen violence.

Top contributors

More