Andrew Scott Crines

British Politics Lecturer, University of Liverpool

I joined the Department of Politics at Liverpool as a Lecturer in British Politics in September 2015. Prior to joining I was a Research Fellow at the University of Leeds in Rhetoric and Oratory. I am a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. In 2017 I also won the PSA Richard Rose Prize for making a distinctive contribution to the study of British politics.

I regularly tweet at @AndrewCrines.

My research focuses on how leading political figures navigate the complex relationship between themselves and the electorate. I examine this relationship by deconstructing their use of rhetorical and oratorical techniques within a range of political and ideological arenas, such as conference, assemblies, and through the media. I have published extensively on the impact of political communication in journals such as Journal of Common Market Studies, British Journal of Politics and International Relations, Journal of Elections, Public Opinions and Parties, Parliamentary Affairs, Journal of Legislative Studies, British Politics, Politics and Religion, Global Discourse, Representation, Political Quarterly, and Political Insight.

At present I am involved in four major projects.

The first examines the voting behaviour of Conservative Parliamentarians in relation to the recent vote in the UK referendum, the leadership election vote, international aid, and social policy. This project is in collaboration with Timothy Heppell and Richard Hayton (Leeds) and David Jeffery (Liverpool) and is in the process of producing outputs through leading academic journals.

The second examines the rhetorical and oratorical styles of populist rhetoric in British party politics from 1945 to present day. This will produce a monograph which is under contract with Palgrave, and is due to be published next year.

The third is a re-evaluation of the leadership of Edward Heath. This project, in collaboration with Tim Heppell (Leeds) is a workshop event that is intended to produce an edited collection with Oxford University Press. This project is funded through the PSA Politics and History Specialist Group. Thus far it has attracted the contributory support of leading academics and/or politicians and is due for publication in 2020.

The fourth project is an examination of leadership selection in British Politics. This project, in collaboration with Peter Dorey (Cardiff) and Andrew Denham (Nottingham) explores the skills needed to be an effective leader of a British political party. My contribution to this project focuses on Labour’s leaders since 1945 and will produce an authored book which is currently under contract with Manchester University Press.

Experience

  • 2015–present
    Lecturer in British Politics, University of Liverpool