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Articles on History

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Andalusi communal dining bowls known as ‘ataifores’ in El Legado Andalusí, Museum of the Alhambra, Granada.

New archaeology finding shows how Muslim cuisine endured in secret despite policing by the Spanish Catholic regime

Practicing Islam was banned in Spain after the Catholic conquest but recent discoveries prove that Muslims continued eating traditions in secret.
A guard outside the National Convention Center in Hanoi, January 26, 2021. Manan Vatsyayana/AFP

Book excerpt: ‘Misconceptions about Vietnam’

In a new book, Hiên Do Benoit looks at Vietnam’s society, culture and political and economic history, and provides us with the keys to understanding this state unlike any other..
Although a product of the current cultural environment, QAnon also reproduces trends and dynamics from the earliest history of Christianity. (Shutterstock)

History repeats itself: From the New Testament to QAnon

A revisionist reading of reality, in which social and political events are only understood by a chosen few, is the basis of the QAnon gospel.
An aerial shot of The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam reservoir filling up. Taken in 2020. Photo by Gallo Images/Orbital Horizon/Copernicus Sentinel Data 2020

Innovations on the Nile over millennia offer lessons in engineering sustainable futures

Nile communities carefully monitored and recorded the river’s flow. Centuries later these records are still being used by water resource managers around the world to analyse unpredictable river flows.
In our current context of rapidly improving technology, archives and museums must constantly make tough decisions about what to keep, what to refuse or even remove. (Shutterstock)

From erasure to recategorizing: What we should do with Dr. Seuss books

Media coverage of the recent Dr. Seuss controversy are rooted in both a lack of awareness of the challenges and realities of maintaining collections and a false understanding of history.
Huntsville reveres hometown hero Sam Houston. And he did not revere the Confederacy. Jimmy Henderson/flickr

Texas distorts its past – and Sam Houston’s legacy – to defend Confederate monuments

Texas' most famous statesman, Sam Houston, was a slave owner who opposed the Confederacy. But white Texans tend to omit his dissent in current debates over removing Confederate markers.
Women protested outside the White House in 1917, seeking the right to vote. Harris & Ewing via Library of Congress

Deaf women fought for the right to vote

Despite harsh, discriminatory conditions, low pay and lack of appreciation, deaf women have fought with brilliance and dedication for personal and professional recognition, including the right to vote.

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