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Articles on European Space Agency (ESA)

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Modern computing allows to spot isolated trees and shrubs in semi-arid areas, facilitating research on the evolution of vegetation cover. Martin Brandt

How we mapped billions of trees in West Africa using satellites, supercomputers and AI

Advanced techniques allowed our research team to build an open database of billions of individual trees and challenge some common perceptions about vegetation in arid and semi-arid zones.
A photo taken from the International Space Station in 2014 shows the Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft on the left and the unpiloted ISS Progress 57 cargo craft. Six years later, private players have joined the space race. Picryl

Major changes coming over the horizon for the global space industry

Over the coming decade, the arrival of constellations of small satellites will reshape the space industry. It constitutes a paradigm shift, particularly in terms of data gathering and processing.
A STS-134 crew member on the space shuttle Endeavour took this photo of the ISS after the station and shuttle began their separation. NASA

The International Space Station at 20 offers hope and a template for future cooperation

Humans have been living on the International Space Station for two full decades. So what comes next for this ailing technology, and what does it mean for future International ventures in space?
On June 5-6, 2012, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory collected images of one of the rarest predictable solar events: the transit of Venus across the face of the Sun. NASA/SDO, AIA

Why we need to get back to Venus

This hot, acidic neighbor with its surface veiled in thick clouds hasn't benefited from the attention showered on Mars and the Moon. But Venus may offer insights into the fate of the Earth.
Space debris in Earth orbit creates a dangerous obstacle course for satellites and astronauts. Dotted Yeti / Shutterstock.com

Why space debris cleanup might be a national security threat

Countries developing technology that removes or blasts away space junk may appear to be doing a public service. But those same technologies can destroy military and communications satellites.

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