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Articles on Mass shootings

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People who want to restrict guns have a point, but so do people who say those laws make little difference in mass shootings. George Frey/AFP via Getty Images

In gun debate, both sides have evidence to back them up

Stricter gun control laws may make mass shootings slightly less common, but other policies may work better to prevent mass shooting deaths.
Police stand near the scene where multiple people were shot at the FedEx Ground facility on April 16, 2021, in Indianapolis. AP Photo/Michael Conroy

Are mass shootings an American epidemic?

Gun violence as a whole is much more common, and much more deadly, than mass shootings are.
After mass shootings, there are more calls for gun control. Here’s one in Boulder, Colo., where 10 people died in a shooting. Jason Connolly / AFP/Getty Images

Gun control fails quickly in Congress after each mass shooting, but states often act – including to loosen gun laws

After mass shootings, politicians in Washington have failed to pass new gun control legislation, despite public pressure. But laws are being passed at the state level, largely to loosen restrictions.
A woman places painted rocks at a memorial to those killed in the 2018 Parkland, Florida, school shooting. AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee

Why do mass shootings spawn conspiracy theories?

When many people believe the government is trying to take away their guns, events that make guns look bad can be misinterpreted as part of that nonexistent plan.
Mourners stand by the casket bearing Brandon Hendricks-Ellison at his funeral service July 15. The 17-year-old basketball star was one of the latest victims of the gun violence across New York City. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Gun violence has fuelled enduring trust issues for many Americans

A new analysis shows that the many Americans who have experienced being threatened by a gun or suffering a gunshot wound are significantly less likely to believe most people can be trusted.
A man and his son pay respects at a memorial to a teacher in Debert, N.S. on April 21, 2020. RCMP say at least 23 people are dead after a man went on a murder rampage in Nova Scotia communities. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Let’s call the Nova Scotia mass shooting what it is: White male terrorism

Until we acknowledge that toxic white masculinity is fuelling mass murders, aggrieved white men will continue to commit them – and we’ll all continue to pay the price.
Workplace-related suicide can have several different motivations. The recent shooting at a Molson Coors plant in Milwaukee may have been fuelled by racism against the perpetrator. (Shutterstock)

Understanding work-related suicide after the Molson Coors shooting

People who take their own lives as a career response have different motives at different stages of their careers. This could help us understand the recent Molson Coors shooting in Milwaukee.
Kevin Vickers, former House of Commons Sergeant-at-Arms, receives the Star of Courage at Rideau Hall from Gov. Gen. David Johnston in February 2016 to pay tribute to security services members who responded to the 2014 shooting on Parliament Hill. Vickers was lauded as a hero. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

When we call survivors ‘heroes,’ we’re missing the full picture

We do a disservice to survivors of major tragedies when we call them “heroes.” Instead, we should change our policies and attitudes to help them truly survive the disaster.
Drills can help people learn how to respond when an active shooter situation arises, as recently occurred in Santa Clarita, Calif. AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

Do lockdown drills do any good?

Being ready takes training and practice. But it might not require fake blood and simulated shootings.

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