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Articles on Mass shootings

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The mass shooting at a dance studio in Monterey Park, Calif., is the latest in an endless string of gun violence tragedies. AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Horror and anguish are playing out on repeat following the latest mass shooting – and the mental health scars extend far beyond those directly affected

Even people who are only indirectly exposed to these repeat tragedies, such as first responders and those affected by media coverage, can experience profound and long-lasting grief.
Only about 1 in 3 LGBTQ victims of violent hate crimes seek professional help for mental health issues that emerge after an attack. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

LGBTQ Americans are 9 times more likely to be victimized by a hate crime

For the first time, researchers have been able to produce estimates of the rate of hate crimes against LGBTQ people.
White nationalist Dylann Roof appears in court on June 19, 2015, after his arrest in the mass shootings at a Black church in South Carolina. Grace Beahm-Pool/Getty Images

Fueled by virtually unrestricted social media access, white nationalism is on the rise and attracting violent young white men

Since 2017, the FBI has warned US Congress that the rise of white nationalism and the violence of extremist militia groups is a dangerous domestic terrorism threat.
With the ever-increasing media coverage of mass shootings in the U.S., even the youngest children are now repeatedly exposed to violent images on TV and online. Blend Images/Inti St Clair/Tetra Images via Getty Images

Children are bombarded with violence in the news – here’s how to help them cope

The unending stream of violence on news and entertainment programming can have a negative impact on kids of all ages.
Heroic actions are often intuitive – even impulsive – rather than a product of thoughtful deliberation. MHU/Getty Images

What makes people willing to risk their lives to save others?

Study after study has shown that men tend to be more willing to put themselves in harm’s way to help others. Why some men rise to the occasion – and others don’t – has been a bit trickier to pin down.
Reenactments of Old West gunfights, like this one at a tourist attraction in Texas in 2014, are part of the mythology underpinning the United States’ gun culture. Carol M. Highsmith via Library of Congress

American gun culture is based on frontier mythology – but ignores how common gun restrictions were in the Old West

A scholar of gun culture looks at the roots of Americans’ love affair with firearms – and their willingness to accept gun violence as a price of freedom.
A playground bench is colorfully decorated at the new Sandy Hook Elementary School, which replaced the one torn down after a gunman killed 20 first graders and six educators in 2012. AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

Demolishing schools after a mass shooting reflects humans’ deep-rooted desire for purification rituals

An anthropologist explains the power of purification rituals, such as bringing down a building following a tragic occurrence in it, and why they help reduce our anxieties.
Ade Osadolor-Hernandez of Students Demand Action speaks at a rally outside the U.S. Capitol in May 2022. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

US tragedies from guns have often – but not always – spurred political responses

Congress tends to be most likely to act after an assassination or assassination attempt of historic proportions or mass shootings. But sometimes lawmakers do nothing beyond debate new measures.

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