Articles on Parasites

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Giardia is an example of a parasite you don’t want to catch. Symptoms can include diarrhoea, abdominal cramps, fatigue, weakness and weight loss. From shutterstock.com

What are parasites and how do they make us sick?

There are three classes of parasites that can cause disease in humans. Here's what you need to know.
The world’s smallest frog can fit on a dime. E.N. Rittmeyer et al. (2012)

Curious Kids: What is the smallest animal ever?

Scientists have identified the world's smallest animal – for now. It could be possible smaller creatures exist that have not yet been discovered.
Here’s a close-up picture of a head louse. The eggs of the female head louse are what we call ‘nits’.

Curious Kids: what’s the point of nits?!

We like to think that all creatures play a role in the local ecosystem. We're especially interested in insects that provide a benefit for people too. But that's not always how it is.
A female blacklegged deer tick crawls along a piece of straw. (Shutterstock)

Tick, tock: The countdown to peak tick season is here

Ticks are generally inactive in the winter and start to look for their next meal as temperatures warm up. But as winters warm, every season may become tick season.
Pilostyles are only visible when their fruit and flowers erupt out of their host plants. The Conversation/Wikipedia

The mysterious Pilostyles is a plant within a plant

Only when flowering is Pilostyles visible externally, the flowers erupting from the stems of its host like a weird botanical Alien.
Thelazia gulosa is an eyeworm parasite that infects cows. But an Oregon woman’s discovery of the worms in her own eye has raised concerns about parasites that jump from animals to humans. (Shutterstock)

How animal parasites find a home in humans

A stomach-churning viral video of an Oregon woman who describes removing cattle eyeworms from her eye has renewed interest in parasites that jump from animals to humans. Here's all you need to know.
There are multiple opportunities to detect tapeworm cysts and larvae before the sushi makes it to our plate. Epicurrence

Should raw sushi-eaters be worried about tapeworms?

No, it's extremely rare to contract a parasitic infection from eating sushi or sashimi in Australia.

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