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Articles on Raphael Warnock

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Georgia’s recent election of three Democrats for national office – one Jewish, one Black and one Catholic – upended over a century of politics openly hostile to minorities. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

How new voters and Black women transformed Georgia’s politics

Georgia once had 'the South's most racist governor,' a man endorsed by the KKK. Now its senators are a Black pastor and a Jewish son of immigrants. A scholar of minority voters explains what happened.
Vice President Kamala Harris swears in Sen. Raphael Warnock and Sen. Jon Ossoff on Capitol Hill in Washington. Senate Television via AP

Sen. Ossoff was sworn in on pioneering Atlanta rabbi’s Bible – a nod to historic role of American Jews in civil rights struggle

In choosing a Hebrew Bible belonging to a civil rights leader, Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, Sen. Jon Ossoff appeared to be sending out a message on the strong historic ties between Black people and Jews.
(R to L) Georgia GOP Sens. David Purdue and Kelly Loeffler at a rally with Sen. Tom Cotton on Nov. 19, 2020 in Perry, Ga. Loeffler and Purdue face runoff elections against Democratic Senate candidates Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock on Jan. 5, 2021. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

A brief history of Georgia’s runoff voting – and its racist roots

Elections – like Georgia's runoffs – that require majority support can sometimes be used to exclude those in the minority.

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