Articles on Museums

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Aboriginal elder Major Sumner sits outside Liverpool’s World Museum with a box containing the skull of an Australian indigenous person, taken from Australia between 1902 and 1904. Phil Noble/Reuters

Museums are returning indigenous human remains but progress on repatriating objects is slow

The question of repatriating objects is clearly more complex than returning human remains. It needs more debate, and more creative interventions to move beyond the current impasse.
Hex code from the Blaster worm reveals the potential motivations of the worm’s creator. Ward Moerman

Why save a computer virus?

How can archivists properly preserve computer programs often written specifically to destroy data?
A dress by designer Iris van Herpen, who, with her runway designs, challenges common fashion norms and beliefs. Zach Balbino/flickr

Can technology help fashion clean up its act?

Fast fashion is the second most wasteful industry on Earth. But with the creation of dresses that charge cellphones and clothes made from recycled bottles, we could be on the verge of a green fashion revolution.
This clay facial reconstruction of Kennewick Man, carefully sculpted around the morphological features of his skull, suggests how he may have looked alive nearly 9,000 years ago. Brittney Tatchell, Smithsonian Institution

Kennewick Man will be reburied, but quandaries around human remains won’t

A 9,000-year-old skeleton became a high-profile and highly contested case for the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. How do we respectfully deal with ancient human remains?
Koori women Treahna Hamm, Vicki Couzens and Lee Darroch wear ‘Biaganga’, traditional possum coats at the Melbourne Museum’s Aboriginal Cultural Centre in Melbourne. Julian Smith/AAP

How living museums are ‘waking up’ sleeping artefacts

Museums are cracking open the temperature-controlled, dehumidified display cases and inviting people in. Working with Aboriginal communities is reawakening cultural connections and ancient art forms.
The British Museum owns a number of priceless pieces of Aboriginal art, and claim they’re the best possible home for Australian heritage items. Paul Hudson

Dja Dja Wurrung barks are Australian art – the British Museum should return them

The Dja Dja Warrung bark etchings are hugely significant Aboriginal artefacts. They're back in Australia for only the second time in 160 years. We look at the complex issue of repatriation.
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Click here for art

That traditional monolith of culture, the museum, has begun to embrace the digital world. As a series of projects reveal, the possibilities are endless.

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