Articles on Regulation

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Coal stockpile at a Milwaukee, Wisconsin power plant, 2011. Michael Pereckas

Even when it’s sitting in storage, coal threatens human health

A recent study shows that large piles of coal produce measurable quantities of fine particulate air pollution within a 25-mile radius. Covering coal trains and storage piles could reduce the problem.
APRA chairman Wayne Byres says the inquiry will provide the CBA with change recommendations. Mick Tsikas/AAP

APRA could have investigated CBA years ago: experts

The APRA inquiry puts the regulator in the tricky position of trying to be seen to be tough on bank scandals but juggling its close relationship with the government and the CBA.
A man fixes electric wires in the Lagos Island district. Nigeria has serious power challenges made worse by the way the sector is regulated. Reuters/Akintunde Akinleye

Conflicting laws keep Nigeria’s electricity supply unreliable

The centralised regulation of electric power in Nigeria is stalling progress in the sector. To achieve stable power supply, the country must obey its constitution and decentralise regulation.
Private companies are policing online hate without independent oversight or regulation, which has serious implications and poses risks for basic human rights and freedoms. (Shutterstock)

Why it’s a mistake to celebrate the crackdown on hate websites

After violence in Charlottesville, internet firms are erasing bigoted content. But should private companies serve as unaccountable regulators and be responsible for policing complex social issues?
Snow geese settle on a wetland in North Dakota. If the Trump administration successfully rescinds the Clean Water Rule, many wetlands might lose federal protection. Krista Lundgren USFWS/Flickr

Does Scott Pruitt have a solid case for repealing the Clean Water Rule?

The Clean Water Rule spells out which streams, wetlands and other water bodies receive federal protection. The Trump administration wants to repeal it, but will face high hurdles in court.
This is what a marijuana plant, growing legally in Colorado, looks like. Reuters/Rick Wilking

Pot with patents could plant the seeds of future lawsuits

The federal government outlaws marijuana, but many states are legalizing it. Coupled with the growing number of cannabis-related patents, the potential for court battles is dizzying.
Some nonprofits, including the NAACP, can operate different divisions subject to different IRS rules but with the same branding. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Hillary Clinton is starting a social welfare group. What does that mean?

Social welfare groups have become more common – and more controversial – in recent years. Fixing gaps in the oversight of this kind of nonprofit will take bipartisan action.
Rules imposed after the 9/11 attacks can obstruct aid to Somalia’s internally displaced people. Omar Abdisalan/AMISOM Photo

Anti-terror rules are blocking aid to conflict zones

Rules imposed after 9/11 and still on the books are getting in the way of delivering aid to conflict zones. In countries like Yemen and Syria, it could mean the difference between life and death.
Enron stands as one of the most infamous examples of corporate fraud in history. Lack of regulation in the charter school sector is leaving some schools open to the same type of fraud. Reuters/Richard Carson

Is charter school fraud the next Enron?

Enron stands as one of the most infamous scandals in business history. With a growing charter school sector and lax regulation, the same kind of corruption and fraud is rearing its ugly head.

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