Artikel-artikel mengenai Supreme Court

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The nation’s founders saw education as key to self-rule. Joseph Sohm/www.shutterstock.com

Fight for federal right to education takes a new turn

The Supreme Court long ago rejected the idea of a federal right to education. Can a series of new lawsuits convince the court to change its mind?
Supreme Court justices stood with Brett Kavanaugh, his wife Ashley, President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump on the day of Kavanaugh’s investiture. AP/Supreme Court provided

Kavanaugh’s impact on the Supreme Court and the country may not be as profound as predicted

With Brett Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court, many predict that the court will move to the right on issues from abortion to gun rights. But Supreme Court rulings are often not the last word on a matter.
Activists demonstrate in front of the Supreme Court to protest the confirmation vote of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Why the Kavanaugh hearings were a show trial gone bad

The bitterly contested hearings to confirm Brett Kavanaugh as the newest justice to the U.S. Supreme Court were more of a show trial than a legal procedure.
Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, arrives in the East Room of the White House, July 9, 2018. AP/Alex Brandon

Does a man’s social class have anything to do with the likelihood he’ll commit sexual assault?

Brett Kavanaugh presented himself as a good and reputable man in his recent Senate hearing. But a man's social status and education tell us nothing about whether he's likely to commit sexual assault.
Judge Brett Kavanaugh appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 27. Saul Loeb/Pool Image via AP

Interruptions at Supreme Court confirmation hearings have been rising since the 1980s

One striking feature of Brett Kavanaugh's testimony was the number of times he interrupted. Data shows that hearing interruptions are becoming more common, particularly when the nominee is female.
Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg paying a courtesy call on Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, D-N.Y., left, and Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del., in June 1993, before her confirmation hearing for the Supreme Court. AP/Marcy Nighswander

Ruth Bader Ginsburg helped shape the modern era of women’s rights – before she went on the Supreme Court

Before she became a Supreme Court justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s work as an attorney in the 1970s fundamentally changed the court’s approach to women's rights and how we think about women – and men.
Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh used baseball to explain his judicial philosophy during his Senate confirmation hearing. Reuters/Alex Wroblewski

Kavanaugh’s ‘judge as umpire’ metaphor sounds neutral but it’s deeply conservative

Kavanaugh thinks judges 'must be an umpire – a neutral and impartial arbiter.' So does Chief Justice Roberts. But more liberal jurists believe that the application of the law is inherently subjective.

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