American University School of International Service

American University’s School of International Service (SIS) is a top-10 school of international affairs located in Washington, D.C. Since our founding in 1957, we have answered President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s call to prepare students of international affairs to “wage peace.” We do so because we believe the world needs leaders ready to serve.

SIS produces transformational research and prepares more than 3,000 graduate and undergraduate students for global service in government, nonprofits, and business. Our students learn from more than 120 full-time faculty – leading political scientists, economists, sociologists, anthropologists, demographers, geographers, historians, and experts in international development, global health, communications, energy, and the environment – and benefit from an active international network of more than 20,000 alumni. They graduate prepared to combine knowledge and practice and to serve the global community as emerging leaders.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 35 articles

Macron and Trump, seen here meeting in September 2017, have reportedly developed a good working relationship despite their many ideological differences. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

Macron-Trump summit has high stakes for France’s embattled leader

Trump is rolling out the red carpet for Macron's visit to Washington. But the French president has some tough talks ahead, as the two leaders discuss thorny issues like trade and the Iran deal.
Peruvian ceviche doesn’t just taste good — it can be a force for social change. Enrique Castro-Mendivil/Reuters

5 food trends that are changing Latin America

Pioneering chefs from Bolivia to Brazil are stepping out of the kitchen and into public service. The 'social gastronomy' movement uses food to create jobs, prevent violence and boost economies.
President Donald Trump with now-former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, right, and former National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster. AP /Andrew Harnik

Trump national security staff merry-go-round reflects decades of policy competition and conflict

John Bolton just started his job as National Security Adviser to President Trump. He's the latest in a ever-changing cast of staffers, raising the question: Who's in charge of national security?
A flag with Korean peninsula unification symbol at the opening ceremony of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. REUTERS/Andy Clark/Files

Is a unified Korea possible?

North Korea has taken up the South's invitation to the Olympics, but a quick look at the history of North-South talks suggests that unity is not as close as it may seem.
Donald Trump’s and Rodrigo Duterte’s mutual admiration could bring about a thaw in U.S.-Philippine relations. Reuters/Athit Perawongmetha

Did Trump’s charm offensive work in the Philippines?

When Obama was president, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte threatened to break up with America. Is it time to make up?
A young girl wearing the Spanish flag (right) walks with another young girl wearing an ‘estelada,’ or independence flag. AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti

Why the European Union’s hands are tied over Catalonia

An expert explains why the EU is ill-equipped to handle a problem like Catalonia.
A woman with symptoms of cholera walks into a cholera treatment center at Immaculate Conception Hospital in Les Cayes, Haiti in November 2016 in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew. Reuters/Andres Martinez Casares

Cholera fears rise following Atlantic hurricanes: Are we making any progress?

Surviving a hurricane in poor countries such as Haiti is no guarantee of surviving the secondary problem of cholera.
An anti-U.S. protest in Yemen during Trump’s visit to Saudi Arabia. Reuters/Khaled Abdullah

Can Congress pressure the White House on human rights?

Congress is trying to curb the president's ties to human rights abusers, harkening back to landmark legislation of the 1970s.
Unlike every president who followed him, George H.W. Bush had a background in foreign policy. In 1972, Bush was serving as U.S. ambassador to the U.N. AP Photo/Dave Pickoff

George H.W. Bush: America’s last foreign policy president

The first President Bush had some impressive foreign policies wins, but could he be best remembered for getting the US entangled in Iraq?
Electoral posters of a candidate in the upcoming parliamentary elections, in Marseille, France. AP Photo/Claude Paris

Four reasons why the French parliamentary elections matter

Emmanuel Macron may have won the presidential election, but his agenda could fail if his party doesn't get a majority in Parliament.
Merkel consider her options after meeting with Trump on May 26, 2017, in Italy. AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Trump to Europe: You’re on your own

For more than seven decades, US presidents have encouraged peace in Europe. Trump seems eager to toss that legacy aside. Here's what is at stake.
A U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer hands documents to a woman entering the U.S. from Mexico. Brad Doherty/AP Photo

Rewriting NAFTA has serious implications beyond just trade

President Trump wants to renegotiate or eliminate NAFTA because of its impact on U.S. trade, but the accord is also a cornerstone of continental cooperation on security issues as well.
British Prime Minister Theresa May called on Tuesday for an early election. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Theresa May’s snap election gamble, explained

Wondering how the U.K. government can just decide to dissolve itself and call for a general election? As our expert explains, it's not uncommon.

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