Boston University

Boston University is no small operation: it has over 33,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 140 countries, 10,000 faculty and staff, 16 schools and colleges, and 250 fields of study. BU was founded in 1839.

Boston University offers bachelor’s degrees, master’s degrees, and doctorates, and medical, dental, business, and law degrees through eighteen schools and colleges on two urban campuses. The main campus is situated along the Charles River in Boston’s Fenway-Kenmore and Allston neighborhoods, while the Boston University Medical Campus is in Boston’s South End neighborhood. BU also operates 75 study abroad programs in more than 33 cities in over twenty countries and has internship opportunities in ten different countries (including the United States).

The university counts seven Nobel Laureates including Martin Luther King, Jr. (PhD ‘55) and Elie Wiesel, 35 Pulitzer Prize winners, nine Academy Award winners, Emmy and Tony Award winners among its faculty and alumni. BU also has MacArthur, Sloan, and Guggenheim Fellowship holders as well as American Academy of Arts and Sciences and National Academy of Sciences members among its past and present graduates and faculty.

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 89 articles

Director James Comey makes it official: The FBI is investigating allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Russia, an alleged coup and Montenegro’s bid for NATO membership

Russian interference in the U.S. election is part of a bigger pattern, according to a former ambassador from Montenegro to NATO.
The New Thought movement left behind an important legacy. Wesley Nitsckie

Why you should know about the New Thought movement

A 19th-century movement, New Thought, came to a have deep influence on the prosperity gospel - that faith could lead one to health and material wealth. What does it tell us about Trump's faith?
Three generations of a Wisconsin family with a nine-point buck. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources/Flickr

Is hunting moral? A philosopher unpacks the question

What place does hunting have in our urbanized society? Is it acceptable to kill for fun? For conservation? Philosophy doesn't have all the answers, but it can help us understand opposing views.
A woman holding a picture of Castro and Chavez waits to pay homage to Castro in Havana on Nov. 28, 2016. AP Photo/Ricardo Mazalan

Questions I never got to ask Fidel Castro

A former British ambassador to Cuba, now a professor at Boston University, still has a few questions for the late Cuban leader.
Global climate negotiators come to Marrakesh to talk about how to transfer money from rich to poor countries for climate adaptation, among other issues. leungchitak/flickr

Global climate talks move to Marrakesh: Here’s what they need to achieve

Negotiators face a daunting task at the COP22 climate talks in Marrakesh: Build on the momentum of Paris and resolve difficult questions over money for poor countries.
New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio signs legislation lowering the default speed limit from 30 to 25 miles per hour, Oct. 27, 2014. NYC Department of Transportation/Flickr

Urban nation: What’s at stake for cities in the 2016 elections

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have painted starkly different views of U.S. cities during the campaign. Will the next president deliver the funding and political support mayors are seeking?
Scientists themselves may be the key to finding the right balance. Scales image via www.shutterstock.com.

Accurate science or accessible science in the media – why not both?

The public loses when their only choices are inaccessible, impenetrable journal articles or overhyped click-bait about science. Scientists themselves need to step up and help bridge the divide.

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors