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Cancer Council Australia

Cancer Council is Australia’s peak national non-government cancer control organisation. Its vision is to minimise the threat of cancer to Australians, through successful prevention, best treatment and support.

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Articles (1 - 19 of 19)

Aim to get a few minutes of summer sun each morning or afternoon. ArTono/Shutterstock

How to protect your skin while getting enough vitamin D

It’s been more than 30 years since Sid Seagull first urged us to slip, slop and slap while out in the sun. But while we’ve made enormous progress fighting skin cancer, melanomas are still the fourth most…
A cancer cluster generally features an unusually high number of the same type of cancer occurring in a group of people with a common exposure. Shutterstock

Explainer: what are cancer clusters?

Most of us are living longer and we are all expected to be working longer. Because the likelihood of cancer increases as we age, we’re more likely to be diagnosed with cancer while still a member of the…
Reduce your cancer risk by reducing your alcohol consumption. V31S70/Flickr

Health Check: does alcohol cause cancer?

Alcohol and cancer is a topic that arouses a lot of controversy: many Australians like the odd drink but don’t want to make the connection to cancer, the world’s biggest killer. The World Health Organisation’s…
Being obese increases your risk of a number of common cancers. CGP Grey/Flickr

Cancer: the world’s biggest killer

The World Cancer Report 2014, the first global snapshot of cancer since 2008, shows the disease is now the world’s biggest killer. In 2012, there were 8.2 million cancer deaths and 14.1 million new cancer…
Just over 15% of Australians smoke daily and a further 1.5% smoke each week. Flickr/benessere

Health Check: how harmful is social smoking?

If you only light up when you’re drinking or out with friends, you probably don’t identify as a smoker or consider the health impact of the occasional fag. Social smokers don’t usually smoke every day…
There’s no doubt that some of the chemicals in tattoo ink have been associated with cancer – but it’s a bit more complicated. Image from shutterstock.com

To dye for? Jury still out on tattoo ink causing cancer

Scientists have recently raised alarm over the possibility that some inks used for tattoos contain cancer-causing chemicals. To make matters worse, some pigments come as small particles called nanoparticles…
Even if sunscreen is applied very thickly, vitamin D production is reduced but not stopped. Shutterstock

Six things you need to know about your vitamin D levels

Vitamin D has emerged as “the vitamin of the decade”, with a long and growing list of maladies supposedly caused through its absence or prevented through its bountiful supply. But is there adequate evidence…
Based on the evidence, it’s safe to dismiss this one as a myth. Flickr/lism

Monday’s medical myth: deodorants cause breast cancer

The concern that using deodorants and antiperspirants might increase the risk of breast cancer has been around for around for at least 15 years, probably longer. The theory suggests that either parabens…
Sunscreen shouldn’t be your only defence against the sun – clothing, hats, sunglasses and shade are equally important. Flickr/stray kat

Sunscreen, skin cancer and the Australian summer

With the long, hot Australian summer comes the imperative to manage the country’s enormous skin cancer risk. Along with the growing raw numbers (11,545 skin cancer cases diagnosed in 2009) and rates of…
During summer, most of us get adequate vitamin D from just a few minutes of daily sun exposure. AveLardo

Monday’s medical myth: we’re not getting enough sun

Myths abound about UV radiation and its effect on our health. We hear that sun-protection has triggered an epidemic of vitamin D deficiency; being tanned protects you from sunburn; a tan looks healthy…
Ovarian cancer is a significant cause of illness and death in Australia. Flickr Lindsey G (modchik)

It’s time to adjust our cancer research priorities

Cancer has been a National Health Priority Area since 1996 because of the burden it places on the Australian community. Of course, cancer isn’t just a health and economic burden – it takes an enormous…
Better diets and more exercise could prevent 43,000 cancer diagnoses a year. joshbousel

One in four cancers preventable – but first we need the willpower

Cancer is one of the most common public health threats facing Australians and accounts for nearly one-fifth of the disease burden in this country. The direct cost to the Australian community is approaching…
Bowel cancer screening shouldn’t just be limited to Australians turning 50, 55 and 60. duvelNZ

Bowel cancer screening delays all about dollars but make no sense

In more than 30 years of treating cancer patients, I have seen some health policy decisions that defy common sense. But the most senseless of all is Treasury’s continued refusal to expand the National…
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Monday’s medical myth: stress causes cancer

Cancer is a disease of the body’s cells that affects around half of all Australians by the age of 85. Normally cells grow and multiply in a controlled way. But if something causes a mistake to occur in…
Food labels may help curb the obesity epidemic but opponents willfully misrepresent what we know about them. Marshall Astor

Seeing red: critics of better food labels fail to understand public health measures

Nutritional labels on food packaging empower consumers to make healthier and more informed food choices. But like other measures taken for public health, food labelling also has its critics. There’s clear…
More than seven thousand Australians die each year of lung cancer but not all are smokers. Flickr/Social is better

Lung cancer patients deserve greater support, whether they smoke or not

Each year 40,000 Australians die from cancer-related illness – the number one cause being lung cancer. Surprised? You’re not alone. According to a recent Galaxy poll which asked asked Australians which…
Hookahs are actually more dangerous because users are likely to puff more frequently.

Monday’s medical myth: hookahs are less harmful than cigarettes

After decades of successful anti-tobacco campaigns, we’re all familiar with the risks of smoking. But how do the health harms of cigarettes compare with those of other smoking devices? The hookah, also…

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