Cornell University

Cornell University is an Ivy League and federal land-grant research university located in Ithaca, New York. Founded in 1865 by Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White, the university was intended to teach and make contributions in all fields of knowledge — from the classics to the sciences, and from the theoretical to the applied. These ideals, unconventional for the time, are captured in Cornell’s motto, a popular 1865 Ezra Cornell quotation: “I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study.”

The university is broadly organized into seven undergraduate colleges and seven graduate divisions at its main Ithaca campus, with each college and division defining its own admission standards and academic programs in near autonomy. The university also administers two satellite medical campuses, one in New York City and one in Education City, Qatar. Cornell is one of three private land grant universities. Of its seven undergraduate colleges, three are state-supported statutory or contract colleges, including its agricultural and veterinary colleges. As a land grant college, it operates a cooperative extension outreach program in every county of New York and receives annual funding from the State of New York for certain educational missions. The Cornell University Ithaca Campus comprises 745 acres, but in actuality, is much larger due to the Cornell Plantations (more than 4,300 acres) as well as the numerous university owned lands in New York.

Since its founding, Cornell has been a co-educational, non-sectarian institution where admission is offered irrespective of religion or race. Cornell counts more than 245,000 living alumni, 34 Marshall Scholars, 29 Rhodes Scholars and 44 Nobel laureates as affiliated with the university. The student body consists of nearly 14,000 undergraduate and 7,000 graduate students from all 50 American states and 122 countries.

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Soldiers patrol on the Promenade des Anglais in Nice, France, July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard

It’s time for us to admit we’re afraid of terrorism

The far right isn't afraid to admit to fear in the wake of brutal attacks like the one in Nice. More mainstream politicians would be wise to follow suit.
People at The Churchill Tavern in New York City react to the Brexit vote. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Britain exits the EU: how Brexit will hit America

The Brexit is on, shifting the political landscape in Europe. Scholars from Cornell, Pennsylvania State and Colorado State universities comment on what it means for U.S. foreign policy and investors.
Species lost from the eastern forests of the U.S. – from left to right: Ivory-billed Woodpecker, Passenger Pigeon, Carolina Parakeet and Bachman’s Warbler. Alexander C. Lees ©Cornell University Museum of Vertebrates

Will we soon see another wave of bird extinctions in the Americas?

The extinction threat you haven't heard of: several South American birds teeter on the brink of existence due to habitat loss. And history is not the best guide for how to save them.
Moggafogga/Flickr

D’où viennent nos chiens ?

D’où vient le meilleur ami de l’homme ? On savait que les chiens descendaient du loup, on apprend aujourd’hui, grâce à la génétique, que cela s’est passé en Asie centrale.
How much do hiring decisions in academia factor in the gender of the applicant? Files image via www.shutterstock.com.

Women preferred for STEM professorships – as long as they’re equal to or better than male candidates

Previous research found a preference in academia for hiring stellar female candidates over stellar male candidates for STEM jobs. A new study investigated what happens if applicants aren't as evenly matched.

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