Cornell University

Cornell University is an Ivy League and federal land-grant research university located in Ithaca, New York. Founded in 1865 by Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White, the university was intended to teach and make contributions in all fields of knowledge — from the classics to the sciences, and from the theoretical to the applied. These ideals, unconventional for the time, are captured in Cornell’s motto, a popular 1865 Ezra Cornell quotation: “I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study.”

The university is broadly organized into seven undergraduate colleges and seven graduate divisions at its main Ithaca campus, with each college and division defining its own admission standards and academic programs in near autonomy. The university also administers two satellite medical campuses, one in New York City and one in Education City, Qatar. Cornell is one of three private land grant universities. Of its seven undergraduate colleges, three are state-supported statutory or contract colleges, including its agricultural and veterinary colleges. As a land grant college, it operates a cooperative extension outreach program in every county of New York and receives annual funding from the State of New York for certain educational missions. The Cornell University Ithaca Campus comprises 745 acres, but in actuality, is much larger due to the Cornell Plantations (more than 4,300 acres) as well as the numerous university owned lands in New York.

Since its founding, Cornell has been a co-educational, non-sectarian institution where admission is offered irrespective of religion or race. Cornell counts more than 245,000 living alumni, 34 Marshall Scholars, 29 Rhodes Scholars and 44 Nobel laureates as affiliated with the university. The student body consists of nearly 14,000 undergraduate and 7,000 graduate students from all 50 American states and 122 countries.

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Many of Latin America’s leftist ‘revolutions’ are now in crisis. But the left is resurging in some countries. The Conversation / Photo Claudia Daut/Reuters

The Latin American left isn’t dead yet

Progressives are leading in the presidential elections of Argentina, Uruguay and Bolivia, bucking the region's recent rightward trend. But there are lessons in the failures of leftists past.
Trump’s approval rating has a lower ceiling and higher floor than that of past presidents. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

Investigations usually hurt a president’s public reputation – but Trump isn’t usual

Investigations often damage the president's approval rating, particularly if the inquiry drags on for a long time. But that may not matter to a historically unpopular president like Trump.
Do social enterprises come to view profit as more important than their original mission? New research suggests they don’t, and the cause remains a key component of their success. Kat Yukawa/Unsplash

How non-profits can use business as a force for good

New research suggests that non-profits tempted by the social enterprise model do not necessarily lose sight of their social mission in favour of profits. In fact, the opposite is true.
New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern wore a headscarf to comfort mourning family members after the Christchurch mosque shootings. AP Photo/Vincent Thian, File

Is there a ‘feminine’ response to terrorism?

After the Christchurch mosque shootings, New Zealand's prime minister didn't start a war on terror. She covered her head, cried, paid for funerals and passed gun control. Is it because she's a woman?
Bank swallows, like this juvenile, may become endangered unless habitat loss and other threats are reduced. Shutterstock

How birders helped pinpoint hotspots for migratory bird conservation

A collection of millions of bird sightings has identified the best places to invest in conservation.
Richard Nixon flashes the victory sign on the night he received the Republican nomination for president Aug. 9, 1968 in Miami. AP File/AP Photo

Why it’s hard to remove, or even diagnose, mentally ill or unstable presidents

Some cite mental illness, or at least instability, as a basis to remove Pres. Trump from office. A doctor and a lawyer use a 1965 novel, 'Night of Camp David,' to explain why that's unlikely.
These fresh vegetables and fruits are the result of hundreds to thousands of years of plant breeding and selection. Irina Sokolovskaya / Shutterstock.com

Skipping a few thousand years: Rapid domestication of the groundcherry using gene editing

It has taken hundreds, if not thousands, of years to create the juicy, shiny produce that you take for granted at the supermarket. But now there is a faster way to domesticate wild fruits and veggies.
Researchers found that families who send their children off to college face an increased risk for foreclosure. Monkey Business Images/www.shutterstock.com

Thinking about borrowing against your home to send your kids to college? Think again

The odds of foreclosure double for families who send their kids off to college, according to two researchers who say their findings show a need for new ways for Americans pay for higher education.

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