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CSIRO is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research organisations in the world. We focus on creating a positive impact and on answering the big questions for industry and society.

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Articles (1 - 20 of 319)

Climate models show Sydney could get drier or wetter. Which scenario do we choose when making decisions? Joel Carrett/AAP

Warmer, wetter, hotter, drier? How to choose between climate futures

Depending on what model you use, climate change could make Sydney a little bit warmer, much hotter, wetter, or drier. Which one should we use? When it comes to planning for climate change, it's important to look at all the possible futures.
Water from coal seam gas mining would be treated at a reverse osmosis plant before being re-injected into the ground. CSIRO

Can water from coal seam gas be re-injected into the ground?

The Queensland government wants companies to use waste water from coal seam gas extraction for useful purposes such as recharging aquifers. New CSIRO research shows that, with careful monitoring, it can be done.
Not all science demonstrations will appeal to all people. Melanie Davies/Flickr

Engaging the disengaged with science

Most science communication appeals to those who already love science. It's harder, but important, to reach out to the disengaged too.
For the first time, the February monthly average carbon dioxide levels at the Mauna Loa Observatory have passed 400ppm. NOAA/Wikimedia Commons

February carbon dioxide levels average 400ppm for first time

We have hit a new milestone in carbon dioxide levels: the average for February topped 400ppm. It's the first time this has happened in the northern winter, when levels are typically lower than in summer.
Whether leaving early or staying to defend, a reliable and adaptable bushfire survival plan is a must. AAP Image/David Mariuz

Bushfires kill, but knowing exactly how might make them less deadly

The latest round of bushfires, which claimed 27 homes in the Adelaide Hills, has once again highlighted the importance of planning for the worst. Mercifully, no human lives were lost, and it will be important…
There is no evidence that the health benefits of milk are compromised by pasteurisation. jacqueline/Flickr

Explainer: what is raw milk and why is it harmful?

Milk is a highly nutritious food, and an important source of amino acids and minerals such as phosphorus and calcium, which contributes to bone health. Historically, milk was prone to contamination by…
RV Investigator at sea – It will be formally commissioned in Hobart today. CSIRO

Explainer: the RV Investigator’s role in marine science

We know more about the surface of the moon than we do about our deepest oceans, and only 12% of the ocean floor within Australia’s Exclusive Economic Zone has so far been mapped. The reason for this is…
Some websites can drive you crazy. Flickr/Jonathan Brodsky

A new way to fix those frustrating websites

How many times have you been looking for information online, only to find yourself going round and round in circles? Or you’ve spent too long poking around a website trying to find what you need, only…
CSIRO’s solar-concentrating mirrors can be used for several purposes, including creating high-energy ‘SolarGas’. CSIRO

Australia should export more ideas and fewer greenhouse emissions

As climate negotiators meet at the United Nations' Lima summit, which comes hot on the heels of the landmark US-China climate deal, there is a renewed focus on how the world can move to a lower-emissions…
Honeybees pollinate a third of Australia’s food crops. Losing them due varroa might would cost the economy billions of dollars. David McClenaghan

Australian farmers face increasing threat of new diseases: report

A nationwide outbreak of foot and mouth disease; an invasion of a devastating wheat disease; our honeybees completely wiped out. These are just three possible disastrous scenarios facing Australia; they’re…
Some rat, possum and mozzie species thrive when living close to people. Mark Philpott/Flickr

Urbanisation brings animals and diseases closer to home

Our world is becoming increasingly urbanised. In 1950, just 30% of the world’s population lived in urban areas. This number is now over 50% and rising. By 2050, two-thirds of the world’s population are…
Tractors may have revolutionised farming but to protect biosecurity, farmers could do with some extra help. Ben McLeod/Flickr

Go with the grain: technology to help farmers protect crops

New technology to tackle biosecurity challenges down the track is one of the five megatrends identified in today’s CSIRO report Australia’s Biosecurity Future: preparing for future biological challenges…

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