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The Murrumbidgee River is one of several sites in the Murray-Darling Basin where improvements are being detected. CSIRO/Wikimedia Commons

It will take decades, but the Murray Darling Basin Plan is delivering environmental improvements

The Murray-Darling Basin Plan has been politically fraught and mired in scandal. But environmental monitoring suggests that the health of the rivers is indeed improving – even if it will take decades.
Autonomous vehicles are information-rich platforms thanks to the range of sensors on board that track, monitor and measure everything. Uber

Who’s to blame when driverless cars have an accident?

Sensors that monitor everything a self-driving vehicle does can help determine who is responsible in the case of an accident – the manufacturer, the service centre or the vehicle owner.
British theoretical physicist and cosmologist, Professor Stephen Hawking in 2014. EPA/Andy Rain

Tributes pour in for Stephen Hawking, the famous theoretical physicist who died at age 76

Stephen Hawking inspired people with his work on black holes and other mysteries of the universe. Many were quick to pay tribute to the theoretical physicist who died today in the UK, aged 76.
Flies will often sleep on the underside of leaves, to escape from heat and predators. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Curious Kids: Where do flies sleep?

Flies need good grip because they often sleep upside down.
X-ray vision is not only possible, it already exists – but using computers, not eyes. Marcella Cheng/The Conversation

Curious Kids: Is x-ray vision possible?

Human eyes don't have x-ray vision. But we can use radiography machines to allow our eyes to see inside things the human eye cannot.
Trust is everything. oneinchpunch/Shutterstock.com

Climate scientists and policymakers need to trust each other (but not too much)

Politicians are always being told to trust what climate scientists are telling them. But can you have too much of a good thing? What happens when the exchange of ideas becomes too cosy?
Frost affected many crops across WA during September 2016. WA Department of Primary Industry and Regional Development

Not just heat: even our spring frosts can bear the fingerprint of climate change

We already know that climate change makes heatwaves hotter and longer. But a new series of research papers asks whether there is also a climate fingerprint on frosty spells and bouts of wet weather.
The growth in global carbon emissions has resumed after a three-year pause. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Fossil fuel emissions hit record high after unexpected growth: Global Carbon Budget 2017

After three years in which global carbon emissions scarcely rose, 2017 has seen them climb by 2%, as the long-anticipated peak in global emissions remains elusive.

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