University of California, Santa Barbara

UCSB is one of only 61 institutions elected to membership in the prestigious Association of American Universities. And the Newsweek guide to America’s best colleges has named UCSB one of the country’s “hottest colleges” twice in the past decade.

In addition to five Nobel Laureates, UCSB’s faculty includes many elected members or fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (25), the National Academy of Sciences (32), the National Academy of Engineering (25), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (60). Three UCSB professors also have been named MacArthur Fellows by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 61 articles

A marcher waves a flag during the Capital Pride Parade in Washington, D.C. on June 8, 2019. Nicole S. Glass/Shutterstock.com

23% of young black women now identify as bisexual

According to the General Social Survey, the percentage of men and women who identify as gay or lesbian has held firm. But the share of women who say they're bisexual has skyrocketed.
A school of juvenile bocaccio in the midwaters of Platform Gilda, Santa Barbara Channel, Calif. Scott Gietler

Retired oil rigs off the California coast could find new lives as artificial reefs

Californians love their coast and strongly oppose offshore drilling. Will they support converting old oil rigs to artificial reefs – a policy that benefits both marine life and oil companies?
The Green Party’s Paul Manly celebrates after voting results come in for the Nanaimo-Ladysmith byelection on May 6, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

The Green Party wave could spread across Canada

The Green Party breakthrough in Prince Edward Island and positive result in British Columbia foreshadows the party's prospects at the federal level in the fall.
An MRI image of the brain. SpeedKingz/Shutterstock.com

An unexpected pathway to treating neurodegenerative diseases

Not all drug development needs to start from scratch. Sometimes researchers discover that a drug developed for one disease can be used for another. Here a cancer drug may show promise for dementia.
Scientists are raising Miami blue butterflies in captivity and reintroducing them in south Florida. Jeff Gage/Florida Museum of Natural History

Live cargo: How scientists pack butterflies, frogs and sea turtles for safe travels

How do you pack butterflies for shipping, or frogs for an overland hike to a new habitat? Three scientists explain how they keep threatened species safe on the road and in the air.
Many California wildfires spread from structure to structure, fed by the winds. Cal Fire

How fierce fall and winter winds help fuel California fires

The dry, hot, downslope Santa Ana winds of Southern California fan late fall wildfires that have largely traveled through – and are fueled by – homes and other structures.
What do synchronized vibrations add to the mind/body question? agsandrew/Shutterstock.com

Could consciousness all come down to the way things vibrate?

A resonance theory of consciousness suggests that the way all matter vibrates, and the tendency for those vibrations to sync up, might be a way to answer the so-called 'hard problem' of consciousness.
Cal Fire Division Chief Mark Higgins directs helicopters dropping water in Lakeport, California. AP Photo/Noah Berger

Wildfires are inevitable – increasing home losses, fatalities and costs are not

As California reels from another devastating fire season, environmental resource scholars explain how the state – and other fire-prone areas – can better prepare and coexist with wildfires.
Predatory fish are among the most vulnerable species to human pressures. Rich Carey/Shutterstock

New map shows that only 13% of the oceans are still truly wild

The world has some 500 million square kilometres of ocean. But just 55 million square kilometres remain untouched by intensive human activities such as fishing.
Surgeons in Switzerland use the robot da Vinci to aid a hernia operation. Over a third of US hospitals have at least one surgical robot. AP Photo/Keystone, Salvatore Di Nolfi

Young doctors struggle to learn robotic surgery – so they are practicing in the shadows

There are more robots than ever in the operating room – but that's led to fewer opportunities for surgical trainees. Now, some new doctors are teaching themselves in secret.

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors