University of Copenhagen

With over 38,000 students and more than 9,000 employees, the University of Copenhagen is the largest institution of research and education in Denmark. The purpose of the University - to quote the University Statute - is to ‘conduct research and provide further education to the highest academic level’.

The University of Copenhagen is the oldest University in Denmark - founded in 1479. The University has four campus areas in Copenhagen and consists of six faculties - Health and Medical Sciences, Humanities, Law, Science, Social Sciences and Theology - with over one hundred different departments, institutes, centres, laboratories and museums.

The motivational force of the University’s research activities is financially and politically independent, i.e. free basic research; however, specific collaborative endeavours with other institutions and companies also have a place among the countless research activities. The dissemination of knowledge and findings to other research environments and the general public is a natural element of the University’s research efforts.

The University of Copenhagen’s research-based education also enables the private and public sectors to recruit expert staff and access the latest knowledge in such diverse areas as health, food, biological production and globalisation.

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Displaying 41 - 58 of 58 articles

Mad Men has jumped the shark, people! Mad Men has jumped the shark. Tim Bradshaw

Oh, you have an opinion? Are you sure about that?

Tell us what you think about police brutality, organ donation, Obamacare, private schools, zoos, breast implants and stew. Tweet your instant reaction, share your perspective on anything on Formspring…
The Harlem Kiddies in the St. Thomas club, Copenhagen 1941. Little Beat Records

How an Afro-Jewish band rocked Nazi-occupied Denmark

It seems an impossibility: in Nazi-occupied Denmark in the 1940s, one of the hottest jazz orchestras around was the interracial Harlem Kiddies, with two white and three black band members – and a Jewish…
Vincent F Hendricks likes this post, but in a sort of ironic, self-referential way. Ksayer1

How Facebook changed what it means to ‘like’

The “like” is the predominant gesture on social media, whether you’re sticking to Facebook or shifting to Instagram. It may even be the most common gesture among humans nowadays. Some of us probably “like…
Can I interest you in the Acme Corporation? I’m hearing great things. Rafael Matsunaga

When Twitter storms cause financial panic

On the morning of 22 January 2013 a story started to develop on Twitter about the imminent and unexpected resignation of Jens Weidmann, the CEO of Deutsche Bundesbank. The first documented tweet came at…
If only people had heeded his words then. Niels Bohr Archive

Open science to fight big threats like the nuclear bomb

In 1943, when Niels Bohr, one of 20th century’s greatest scientists, was briefed on the Anglo-American nuclear weapons project, he was worried about the political consequences more than the scientific…
Clint Eastwood and his empty chair don’t let facts get in the way of a good narrative. Lynne Sladky/AP/Press Association Images

All those likes and upvotes are bad news for democracy

Human beings have long been easily influenced by the opinions of others but the social media networks that have come to dominate our lives may be making this “social proof” a problem. A recent study in…
From orange to blue and yellow: Ukraine’s protesters fly the EU flag front and centre. AP

Ukraine’s opposition needs help from Europe’s 89 generation

I will never forget the 12 hours I spent in the Ukrainian women’s prison in Kharkiv. Never in my life have I seen such misery or degrading treatment of prisoners, Nor will I forget my brief conversation…
fc ea.

Big Soda - do you think we’re all stupid?

In life, the dichotomy between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ is usually very blurred. When it comes to food, trying to decide whether something is ‘healthy’ or ‘unhealthy’, is even harder. Red meat, for example, is…
The older journals have greater histories, so researchers are almost coerced into publishing in them. Bridget Coila

Open access: everyone has the right to knowledge

This week, we celebrate open access week – an event aimed at bringing attention to this rapidly emerging form of scientific publication and its ethical imperatives. Traditionally, knowledge breakthroughs…

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