University of Massachusetts Lowell

The University of Massachusetts Lowell (also known as UMass Lowell or UML) is an urban public research university in Lowell, Massachusetts, United States, and part of the University of Massachusetts system.

With more than 1,100 faculty members and nearly 17,000 students, it is the largest university in the Merrimack Valley and the second-largest public institution in the state behind UMass Amherst.

The university offers 120 bachelor’s, 39 master’s and 33 doctoral degree programs, including nationally recognised programs in science, engineering and technology. Academically, UMass Lowell is organised into six schools and colleges: College of Fine Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences; College of Health Sciences; College of Sciences; the Francis College of Engineering; the Graduate School of Education; and the Manning School of Business.

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Clouds of smoke from burning cars mark the skyline of Culiacan, Mexico, during a 12-hour siege by the Sinaloa Cartel, Oct. 17, 2019. AP Photo/Hector Parra

Cartel sieges leave Mexicans wondering if criminals run the country

A series of brazen, highly visible attacks by Mexican drug cartels have killed at least 50 people in the past month, terrorizing citizens and making the government look weak on crime.
When faced with a wildfire, responders must act quickly and decisively to save lives. AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

Making life-or-death decisions is very hard – here’s how we’ve taught people to do it better

Emergency responders and military personnel need to think creatively – even imaginatively – to save lives under pressure. Analyzing the Grenfell Tower Fire in London reveals useful lessons.
Il existe aujourd'hui des applis spécifiques pour les parents qui veulent surveiller la position GPS de leurs enfants. Shutterstock

Pister son enfant avec une appli, une fausse bonne idée

Installer une appli sur le smartphone de son enfant pour suivre ses trajets, est-ce une parade contre les dangers de la rue ? Ou une intrusion dans sa vie privée qui peut nuire aux liens familiaux ?
Can online posts help scholars – or police – tell the difference between people who are just ranting and those who plan real violence? Aggapom Poomitud/Shutterstock.com

Analyzing online posts could help spot future mass shooters and terrorists

Researchers look for signals that might distinguish people who are upset and ranting online from those who intend to do real physical harm.
Refugees awaiting municipal bread distribution in Akcakale, Turkey, Oct. 20, 2019. Three-quarters of the Syrian refugees in Turkey are women and children. AP Photo/Mehmet Guzel

Deportation to Syria could mean death for women, children and LGBTQ refugees in Turkey

Turkey is threatening to send 3.6 million refugees back to the Syrian territory it just invaded. Deporting these vulnerable people would make them the collateral damage of a chaotic, many-sided war.
A fan carries a copy of ‘Abbey Road’ as he traverses the infamous crosswalk that appears on the album’s cover. AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

The Beatles’ revolutionary use of recording technology in ‘Abbey Road’

As the album celebrates its 50th anniversary, an expert in sound recording details how the band deployed stereo and synthesizers to put a unique artistic stamp on this iconic album.
The Supreme Court ruled that baker Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop, could refuse to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple because of his religious beliefs. AP/David Zalubowski)

Christianity at the Supreme Court: From majority power to minority rights

There's been a reversal of power between religious and secular sides of American culture. The Supreme Court is now at the center of that shift.
Nurses in November 2016 expressed support for a ballot proposition to limit what California state agencies pay for prescription drugs. AP/Nick Ut, file

Expanding direct democracy won’t make Americans feel better about politics

Citizens voting directly on policy seems like a good idea. But that led to the Brexit mess in the UK. In the US, two scholars say direct democracy deepens distrust of politics and government.
Law enforcement officers walking to the scene of a shooting at a shopping mall in El Paso, Texas, on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. AP/Rudy Gutierrez

From across the globe to El Paso, changes in the language of the far-right explain its current violence

Major changes in the language of white supremacists have happened in the last decade that provide a window into how the groups mobilize support, shape political perceptions and advance their cause.
The Supreme Court is on summer vacation, but because of John Roberts, they may have to come back. AP/J. Scott Applewhite

Roberts rules: The 2 most important Supreme Court decisions this year were about fair elections and the chief justice

Conflict made its way to the Supreme Court this past session with two cases – one about the census, the other about gerrymandering. A court scholar says the two cases are intimately connected.
Can a country move ahead when its citizens hold dueling facts? Shutterstock

From ‘Total exoneration!’ to ‘Impeach now!’ – the Mueller report and dueling fact perceptions

How can a community decide the direction it should go, if its members cannot even agree on where they are? Two political scientists say the growing phenomenon of dueling facts threatens democracy.

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