University of Melbourne

The University of Melbourne is an internationally recognised, research-intensive university with a strong tradition of excellence in teaching, research and community engagement spanning more than 160 years.

Its outstanding performance in international rankings puts the University of Melbourne at the forefront of higher education globally. It is ranked number 1 in Australia by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings and 28th worldwide. Melbourne’s position as Australia’s top University has also been reaffirmed in the 2013 Shanghai Jiao Tong rankings, in which it has moved up three places from last year, to equal 54th in the world and third in the Asia-Pacific.

The University is uniquely located on the fringe of the city of Melbourne’s central business district. It serves as a hub for the Parkville research precinct – one of the world’s leading centres of medical and biotechnological research – and is a vital part of surrounding neighbourhoods such as cosmopolitan Carlton.

About 50,000 of the best and brightest students from around the globe come to study at the University of Melbourne.

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 4437 articles

Susie Porter as Marie and Kate Jenkinson as Allie in Wentworth. The show’s drama revolves around a women’s prison. Fremantle Media Australia/Xinger Xanger Photograph

Inside the story: writing the powerful female world of Wentworth

In the popular Australian TV series Wentworth, the setting of a women's prison is a pressure-cooker for drama. The setting also allows for greater representation of diverse female characters.
David Bowie in the film clip for Space Oddity: the song would become an anthem for space exploration with an enduring appeal. YouTube

Space Oddity at 50: the ‘novelty song’ that became a cultural touchstone

Fifty years ago, on July 11, 1969, David Bowie released Space Oddity. With its adventurous orchestration, unsettling harmonics and melancholy narrative, the now classic song captured a moment.
Cio-Cio-San (centre) during a dress rehearsal of Opera Australia’s Madama Butterfly at the Sydney Opera House in Sydney in 2019. Works such as this are attracting criticism from some modern audiences. Stephen Saphore/AAP

Opera is stuck in a racist, sexist past, while many in the audience have moved on

Opera companies around the world are grappling with an ever-widening gap between a repertoire frozen in time and an increasingly critical audience.
Mella Jaarsma, The landscaper 2013, costume: wood, paint, iron and leather, single-channel video: 3:40 minutes, colour, sound. National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. Purchased 2018. Photo by Mie Cornoedus

Indonesian art is fresh, energetic and lively. Why do we not see more of it?

The exhibition Contemporary Worlds: Indonesia has many wonderful works. But it is an exception - despite our close proximity, there are few opportunities for Australians to engage with Indonesian art.
A recent study has found that many Obama supporters didn’t vote for Hillary Clinton in the 2016 US election because of the spread of fake news. Chris Kleponis/AAP

Governments are making fake news a crime – but it could stifle free speech

Human rights activists, legal experts and others fear these laws have the potential to be misused to stifle free speech or unintentionally block legitimate online posts and websites.
Arthur Loureiro, Study for ‘The spirit of the new Moon’ 1888, oil on canvas. Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Purchased 1995. Queensland Art Gallery Foundation Grant with the assistance of Philip Bacon through the Queensland Art Gallery Foundation. Celebrating the Queensland Art Gallery's Photograph: QAGOMA

Friday essay: romancing the moon – space dreaming after Apollo

50 years after Apollo 11, a new exhibition considers artistic responses to our celestial neighbour. As we retreat from human space exploration, our relationship to the moon has become virtual.
The government has approved a parliamentary inquiry into press freedom – a step the major media organisations have dismissed as unnecessary. Bianca De Marchi/AAP

Parliamentary press freedom inquiry: letting the fox guard the henhouse

A parliamentary inquiry into press freedom is merely a public relations exercise designed to buy time until the public anger over last month's police raids dies down.

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors