University of Melbourne

The University of Melbourne is an internationally recognised, research-intensive university with a strong tradition of excellence in teaching, research and community engagement spanning more than 160 years.

Its outstanding performance in international rankings puts the University of Melbourne at the forefront of higher education globally. It is ranked number 1 in Australia by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings and 28th worldwide. Melbourne’s position as Australia’s top University has also been reaffirmed in the 2013 Shanghai Jiao Tong rankings, in which it has moved up three places from last year, to equal 54th in the world and third in the Asia-Pacific.

The University is uniquely located on the fringe of the city of Melbourne’s central business district. It serves as a hub for the Parkville research precinct – one of the world’s leading centres of medical and biotechnological research – and is a vital part of surrounding neighbourhoods such as cosmopolitan Carlton.

About 50,000 of the best and brightest students from around the globe come to study at the University of Melbourne.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 3428 articles

Melbourne Lord Mayor Robert Doyle explains the revised Queen Victoria Market redevelopment, flanked by Planning Minister Richard Wynne and Premier Daniel Andrews. Joe Castro/AAP

Social mix in housing? One size doesn’t fit all, as new projects show

Mixing public and private housing in urban renewal projects can be a contentious business. But public good and optimal use of public resources, not developer interests, should guide such decisions.

Open season for our notion-building pollies

Since the Finkel review was announced it has been open season for notion building in the energy space. While Malcolm has been pumping Snowy 2.zero, Craig has been promising death by renewables, quite literally…
President Donald Trump announcing the US’s withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement. Reuters/Kevin Lamarque

Book review: how the merchants of doubt undermine science

A book published seven years ago on the role of lobbyists fighting to discredit science has once again become highly relevant.
Most people think they’re above average intelligence. But we can’t all be above average. from pixabay.com

The strange links between intelligence and prejudice

People tend to hold inflated impressions of their own intelligence: most people think they are above average.
Antibiotics Staphylex, used to treat the infection Golden Staph. TONY PHILLIPS/ AAP

Speaking with: Dr Mark Blaskovich on antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the threat of superbugs

Speaking with: Dr Mark Blaskovich on antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the threat of superbugs. The Conversation, CC BY-ND45.2 MB (download)
William Isdale speaks with Mark Blaskovich about his research into antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the threat these superbugs pose to communities.
Mosquitoes are the main vectors for dengue and zika. Insecticides are our best weapon against them. Anja Jonsson/Flickr

Mozzies are evolving to beat insecticides – except in Australia

Australian mosquitoes, unlike their Asian and American counterparts, can still be controlled by insecticides like pyrethroids. What lessons are there for managing pesticide resistance in insects?
The controversial Narrabri coal seam gas project. Australia has plenty of gas reserves that are cheaper to develop and a safer bet. AAP Image/Dean Lewins

Memo to COAG: Australia is already awash with gas

Australia has enough gas reserves to supply the next 25 years' demand. Federal pressure to lift state bans on onshore gas development is pointless, risky – and won't bring prices down.
Detail from Percy Leason, Thomas Foster, 1934, oil on canvas, 76.0 x 60.8 cm, State Library Victoria, Melbourne. Gift of Mrs Isabelle Leason, 1969 (H32094) © Max Leason

Friday essay: painting ‘The Last Victorian Aborigines’

Anthropologist Percy Leason thought he was painting the extinction of Victoria's Indigenous people in the 1930s. He was wrong, but his portraits, part of a new exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria, are surprisingly sympathetic.
Adding fluoride to tap water to prevent tooth decay is one of our greatest public health achievements. Yet, myths persist about whether it’s safe and works. from www.shutterstock.com

Four myths about water fluoridation and why they’re wrong

Myths that fluoridated water isn't natural, safe, doesn't work and shouldn't be used to make up infant formula persist. Here's what the evidence says.
It’s hard to see how a city can be good for all its people unless they are involved in its creation. Paul James

What actually is a good city?

Developing principles to create cities that are good for all is not easy. Who decides what is good? And for whom? We desperately need a big and general public discussion about this.

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