WZB Berlin Social Science Center.

The WZB Berlin Social Science Centre is Europe’s largest social science institute. Around 160 German and international researchers work at the WZB, including sociologists, political scientists, economists, legal scholars and historians.

The WZB conducts basic research with a focus on problems of modern societies in a globalised world. The research is theory-based, problem-oriented, often long-term and mostly based on international comparisons. Our research areas are: Education, work, life chances Markets and choice Society and economic dynamics International politics and law Dynamics of political systems Migration and diversity

Research results are published for the scientific community as well as for experts in politics, business, the media and civic organisations.

As a non-university research institute, the WZB is member of the Leibniz-Association. The WZB closely cooperates with Berlin universities. Its research directors also hold chairs at universities in Berlin and beyond.

The WZB was founded in 1969 by members of the German parliament from all parties. The WZB is funded by the federal government and the state of Berlin.

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A portrait of US President-elect Donald Trump guards a residential backyard in Iowa, complete with lights and security cameras. Tony Webster/flickr

Trump, the unspeakable and democracy in America

The better-to-do and the established of civil and political society have become complacent and deaf to 'those at the bottom'. The working class has gone over to the right-wing populists.
Donald Trump in New Mexico. Carlo Allegri/Reuters

Populism and democracy: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde?

Donald Trump is the latest example of populism's return to the global political landscape. Nine scholars from seven countries examine the link between populism and democracy.
Riot police detain a supporter of Forum for Democratic Change, Uganda’s leading opposition party, as they break up a campaign procession. Reuters/James Akena

Heavy-handed police tactics raise concerns about democracy in Uganda

The heavy-handed tactics used by Uganda's authorities during the 2016 elections have raised questions about a return to an oppressive past.
When our political institutions are market-driven, they risk becoming a democratic shell that no longer serves the people, as the European Union experience is showing. Theophilos Papadopoulos/flickr

Democracy that bows down to the market is a false compromise

Democracy’s problem is not the crisis but the triumph of capitalism. Democracy has become market-conforming, resulting in whole sections of society lacking meaningful representation.
Higher-income Americans are much more likely to vote than the poor, which reduces political parties’ incentive to tackle inequality. EPA/Michael Reynolds

Failing union of capitalism and democracy fuels rise in inequality

Recent weeks have been all about elections and broken promises: from early April to mid-May, half-a-billion Indians went to the polls in what many described an astonishing display of democratic prowess…

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