Articles on Domestic violence

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Violence against women is often represented as a timeless and universal phenomenon, creating the view the problem is too large to fix, or that only the worst abuses are worthy of attention. James Ross/AAP Image

The long history of gender violence in Australia, and why it matters today

History shows that domestic violence has been deeply entrenched in the culture of Australia from its early days. Progress is only made by understanding this history – and talking about it.
In February, thousands of women marched in Mexico City to demand that President Andrés Manuel López Obrador do more to keep women safe. The protest sign featured here reads, ‘Don’t be indifferent.’ Reuters/Edgard Garrido/Reuters

Mexican president López Obrador has a woman problem

Mexico is the second most dangerous country for women in Latin America. Yet the new government is slashing funding for programs meant to protect and empower women.
A new book by ABC journalist Jess Hill is the result of four years’ investigation into the problem of domestic violence. Shutterstock

See What You Made Me Do: why it’s time to focus on the perpetrator when tackling domestic violence

A new book scrutinises the social and psychological causes of domestic abuse, its terrifying consequences, particularly the impact on children, and the failure of our legal and social institutions to adequately respond.
People between the ages of 25 and 34 are the largest group of woman who find themselves homeless. Oleg Golovnev/Shutterstock

‘I didn’t want to be homeless with a baby’: young women share their stories of homelessness

The largest group of homeless women is between the ages of 25 and 34, and family violence is most often the cause. Their stories testify to the dangers and stresses of not having a place to call home.
A new program in South Australia would offer housing for the perpetrators of domestic violence, allowing their victims to stay in the family home. Shutterstock

An innovative way to counter domestic violence: provide housing for abusers

The SA government is trialling a new program that will provide accommodation and support services to the perpetrators of domestic violence – enabling women and children to remain in the family home.
Many behaviours associated with coercive control are not yet criminal in Australia, even though the impact on victims is profound. Shutterstock

It’s time ‘coercive control’ was made illegal in Australia

New laws in the UK have led to convictions for a range of deplorable behaviours used to control partners in relationships. It's time Australia reconsidered introducing such legislation here.
Religious beliefs about hierarchical gender roles can influence attitudes towards family and domestic violence. Shutterstock

New study finds family violence is often poorly understood in faith communities

Women experiencing family and domestic violence within faith communities can face attitudes and practices that encourage them to stay in relationships with their abusers.
The Coalition government has rejected the Uluru Statement’s call for an Indigenous voice to Parliament, just one of many disappointments for Indigenous peoples. Jeremy Ng/AAP

No matter who is elected, more work remains on women’s rights and Indigenous issues

Some of the Coalition government's initiatives on women and Indigenous issues have been more successful than others. Labor is promising much more.
Coercive control is a form of domestic violence based on a subtle but persistent form of emotional and psychological abuse. from shutterstock.com

Why Sally Challen’s appeal is not a win for women victims of coercive control

Advocates say the recent quashing of Sally Challen's murder conviction brought attention to a hidden feature of domestic violence. But it may have also painted Challen as an unstable woman.
Women who have been victims of domestic abuse may experience depression, anxiety and substance abuse, among other psychological impacts. From shutterstock.com

How domestic violence affects women’s mental health

There is a clear link between women who have experienced domestic violence and mental illness. This link needs to be better addressed in mental health services.
Morrison says the government has shown “the mettle to make the right calls on our nation’s security”. Stefan Postles/AAP

Morrison promises $78 million for combatting domestic violence

The money includes $60 million - over the next three years - in grants for organisations to provide emergency accommodation for those escaping family violence.

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