Articles on Genocide

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Rwandan President Paul Kagame at the 2016 World Economic Forum meeting in Davos. He has drawn flack for seeking a third term. Reuters/Ruben Sprich

Why Kagame’s bid to serve a third term makes sense for Rwanda

Unlike the third-term fever afflicting the Great Lakes region, Rwanda is not mired in corruption and stagnation. Rwandans were fearful and anxious about what might happen after 2017 without Kagame.
Tony Abbott has twice compared Islamic State to the Nazis, but does that aid our understanding of terrorism and what needs to be done to defeat it? AAP/Richard Wainwright

When words fail: comparing Islamic State to the Nazis misses the mark

We need to find ways of speaking about the horrific actions of Islamic State that help, not hinder, understanding of the magnitude of those crimes and what needs to be done to combat them.
There are lessons to be learnt about the ICC from the Kellogg-Briand Pact, signed in 1928. It failed to prevent the outbreak of war but brought war criminals to justice later. Reuters

ICC: sad lesson of lofty ideals trumped by reality repeats itself

The ICC has not lived up to its noble intentions of making the world more just. Its failure echoes that of the 1928 Kellogg-Briand Pact, which set out to banish wars and to settle disputes peacefully.
A judgment by South Africa’s Constitutional Court unambiguously set out South Africa’s legal obligations. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Al-Bashir: what the law says about South Africa’s duties

The South African government’s failure to arrest Omar al-Bashir flies in the face of the Constitutional Court’s decision in 2014 that South Africa has a duty to abide by its international obligations.
A child cries in a cave shelter in Tess village in the rebel-held territory of the Nuba Mountains in South Kordofan. Countless children have been killed by government forces. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

The world’s unexplained silence over human tragedy in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan

Countless Nuba children have been killed by shrapnel, others from a loss of blood pouring from severed limbs. Others have stepped on landmines planted by Sudan's troops.
Does relentlessly criticising Australia’s human rights record risk doing more harm than good? Courntey Biggs/AAP

Is Australia as bad as IS? Skewed criticism may leave you wondering

Australia's human rights record isn't perfect, but it still good. if Australians aren't able to take some pride in that and be inspired to do even better, over-the-top criticism could backfire.
Almost half-a-million newly displaced people have in the past year followed the two million who took refuge in camps after violence erupted in Darfur in 2003. EPA/Olivier Chassot/UNAMID

Retreating from Darfur? A decade on, spectre of atrocities returns

News media have been reporting widespread atrocities by Boko Haram against as many as 2000 civilians in Nigeria. But a similar escalation of violence in Darfur, Sudan, over the past two months has been…

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