Health + Medicine – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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A main course of a complex carbohydrate and protein is important for kids’ lunches, rounded out by fruits, vegetables and water. baibaz/Shutterstock.com

Is there such a thing as a stress-free school lunch? Here’s how to pack one

Nutrition is a key part of learning, but it's often hard to get students to eat a healthful lunch. It can be even harder to pack one. Here are some nutritional and organizational tips.
Donnie Cárdenas, en la cama, espera con su compañero de cuarto Torrey Jewett en el Palomar Medical Center en Escondido, California, el 10 de enero de 2018. Cárdenas tuvo gripe. AP Photo/Greg Bull

Cuatro cosas que puedes hacer para protegerte de la gripe

La gripe no solo está enfermando a millones de personas este año. Está causando miedo y, junto con eso, mucha confusión. ¿Debería vacunarme contra la gripe? ¿Debo ver al doctor? Un experto aconseja.
Sen. Lindsey Graham, R.-S.C., left, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell pictured Sept. 26, 2017 before the vote on Graham’s bill to gut Obamacare. Like others before it, the bill failed. Andrew Harnik/AP

Short-term health plans: A junk solution to a real problem

The Trump administration's latest effort to undermine the Affordable Care Act is the expansion of short-term insurance plans. But these shorter plans are also short on real benefits.
Congolese health workers prepare equipment before the launch of vaccination campaign against the deadly Ebola virus. REUTERS/Samuel Mambo

How the media falls short in reporting epidemics

A study of recent epidemics like Zika and Ebola suggests that the media may fail to tell the public what to do during an outbreak.
Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is used in a variety of applications from plumbing to health care to electronics. By SIRIKANLAYA KHLIBNGERN/shutterstock.com

Obesity and diabetes: 2 reasons why we should be worried about the plastics that surround us

The most common explanation for obesity is overeating calorie-rich foods and a sedentary lifestyle. But new studies suggest that chemicals in our environment might be another cause.
Patients are often overwhelmed by medications, especially when they leave the hospital. EM Karuna/shutterstock.com

How pharmacists can help solve medication errors

The medication landscape is complicated and error-riddled, with very few care providers knowing all the drugs you are taking. Here's how pharmacists could be the solution.
Many athletes stretch before and after exercise, but they may not be gaining benefits from doing so. ESB Basic/shutterstock.com

Why stretching is (still) important for weight loss and exercise

Who hasn't been told to stretch before and after exercise to prevent injury and improve performance? There may be no scientific evidence to back that up, although stretching has other benefits.
Genetic testing is available to people who want to know if they carry a variant of a gene that confers susceptibility for Alzheimer’s. But knowing whether to get tested is hard. Billion Photos/Shutterstock.com

Genetic testing: Should I get tested for Alzheimer’s risk?

Alzheimer's is not only the third leading cause of death in the U.S. but also the most dreaded diagnosis. Genetic testing can help determine susceptibility, but knowing whether to test isn't easy.
Thomas Johnson drinks Gatorade at a ‘Beat the Heat’ event the company sponsored in Fort Worth, Texas, June 10, 2013. Brandon Wade/Invision for Gatorade/AP Photo

Overhydrating presents health hazards for young football players

Yes, it's hot outside. And football practice is starting for thousands of kids. But coaches and parents should be careful about tellings kids to drink more water. That has been deadly.
A boy with a paper cut. Suzanne Tucker/Shutterstock.com

Why do paper cuts hurt so much?

Ouch! Who hasn't felt the effects of a paper cut and then cursed the gods or themselves for the injury? But have you ever wondered why they hurt so much? A professor of family medicine explains why.
U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams demonstrates the proper procedure for administering a nasal injection of naloxone on reporter Jennifer Lott, left, during a visit to the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, Miss., May 17, 2018. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

Naloxone remains controversial to some, but here’s why it shouldn’t be

A recent study argues that naloxone increases opioid use because it protects against death from overdose. Could the number one public health tool to fight the overdose epidemic be making it worse?
German Chancellor Angela Merkel, left, President Donald Trump and Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras before the NATO summit in Brussels July 11, 2018. AP Photo/Ludovic Marin

Reeling from the news? Train your brain to feel better with these 4 techniques

The relentless news cycle has many people feeling overwhelmed and stressed, wondering how to calm their lives and stay healthy. Here are some tips from neuoscience that may help.
This African woman suffers from an autoimmune disease called vitiligo which causes the loss of skin pigment. By andreonegin/shutterstock.com

New treatment in the works for disfiguring skin disease, vitiligo

An autoimmune disease called vitiligo causes white spots to appear on the body, in some cases completely erasing an individual's pigmentation. But a new therapy is on the horizon.