Health + Medicine – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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A police officer in Beijing adjusts his face mask, which millions in China are using in hopes of preventing coronavirus infection, on Feb. 9, 2020. The virus is causing major disruptions. AP Photo/Andy Wong

The silent threat of the coronavirus: America’s dependence on Chinese pharmaceuticals

While US residents may feel safe from the effects of the coronavirus, the aftershocks could be damaging in unexpected ways. The disruption to China's supply chain could cause drug shortages.
Decontee Sawyer, wife of Liberian government official Patrick Sawyer, a naturalized American who died from Ebola after traveling from Liberia to Nigeria, on July 29, 2014. AP Photo/Craig Lassig

Fighting coronavirus fear with empathy: Lessons learned from how Africans got blamed for Ebola

Immigrants experienced stigma and blame during the Ebola crisis when in fact many were instrumental in stopping the spread of the disease. A scholar who studied that response offers insights.
Former President Jimmy Carter pictured at an Atlanta Braves-Toronto Blue Jays game in Atlanta on Sept. 17, 2015, shortly after being treated for melanoma. AP Photo/John Bazemore

Cancer deaths decline in US, with advances in prevention, detection and treatment

Cancer mortality has dropped in the US, due largely to lower smoking rates, as well as early detection and better treatments. These advances often do not extend to people in developing nations.
A horseshoe bat chasing a moth. Horseshoe bats were the source of SARS. Scientists consider bats to be a possible source of coronavirus. DE AGOSTINI PICTURE LIBRARY / Contributor

A clue to stopping coronavirus: Knowing how viruses adapt from animals to humans

Some of the world's worst diseases have come from animals. Bats, cows, camels and horses have all contributed. Now, scientists are working to know which animal introduced the new coronavirus.
A man wearing a surgical mask makes a child wear one outside a hospital where a student who had been in Wuhan is kept in isolation in Thrissur, Kerala state, India. AP Photo

WHO declares global health emergency over coronavirus: 4 questions answered

The World Health Organization declared the new coronavirus to be a public health emergency on Jan. 30, 2020. Does the action really change anything? An expert answers four questions.
A security guard wears a mask as she keeps watch at arriving passengers at Manila’s international airport in the Philippines on Jan. 23, 2020, as part of efforts to contain the coronavirus. AP Photo/Aaron Favila

When will there be a coronavirus vaccine? 5 questions answered

One of the dangers of the new coronavirus is that there is no treatment – and no vaccine. But researchers had already been at work on vaccines for close-related viruses.
Exercising too much, too hard can lead not only to burnout but sometimes to a serious condition that can harm the kidneys. Thayut Sutheeravut/Shutterstock.com

The serious consequence of exercising too much, too fast

When it comes to exercise, there's no month like January, when resolutions kick into gear and call us to the gym. And while physical activity is good, you can injure yourself by overdoing.
A worker in Wuhan, China removes biomedical waste from the Wuhan Medical Treatment Center, where many patients of the coronavirus have been treated, on Jan. 22, 2020. AP Photo/Dake Kang

Are you in danger of catching the coronavirus? 5 questions answered

The coronavirus that has sickened hundreds in Wuhan, China, has worried health officials and other humans across the globe. Should people in the US worry?
Joaquin Phoenix won the award for outstanding performance by a male actor in a leading role for ‘Joker’ at the 26th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards. Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

Joaquin Phoenix’s lips mocked – here’s what everyone should know about cleft lip

After a talk show host mocked Joaquin Phoenix for what she assumed was a cleft lip, the experts address what causes this most common of birth defects.