Health + Medicine – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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Jeff Williams, chief operating officer of Apple, talks about the Apple Watch 4 and its ability to detect irregularities in heartbeat on Sept. 12, 2018 in Cupertino, California. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP Photo

Why health apps are like the Wild West, with Apple just riding into town

As health care grows more digital, an array of health apps promise to track steps, count heartbeats and look at moles. But without more FDA oversight, could we be shooting ourselves in the foot?
Some forms of obesity severely disrupt the metabolic pathways that keep us healthy. Farik gallery, MarShot / Shutterstock.com / Evans Love

There are many types of obesity – which one matters to your health

Body mass index is often used to gauge health. But there may be more accurate measures. A report on your blood metabolites, your metabolome, may distinguish healthier-obese from sicker-obese.
A nurse in Uganda uses a stethoscope to listen for heart problems at a screening and educational event Oct. 31, 2017. Tao Farren-Hefer

Women with heart disease in sub-Saharan Africa face challenges, but stigma may be worst of all

Noncommunicable diseases are a growing problem in Africa. Among women, heart disease is a particular concern. Medication to treat it can interfere with pregnancy, making women undesirable partners.
Surviving breast cancer has been the biggest treatment goal until recent years, when attention began to turn to surviving well, as these three women appear to be. fitzcrittle/Shutterstock.com

Physical therapy important for women treated for breast cancer

While more women than ever are surviving breast cancer, they often do so with bad side effects. Studies are showing that physical therapy early in the post-treatment phase can help.
Babies born 10 miles apart could represent a life expectancy difference of almost 33 years. Ana Prego/shutterstock.com

Being born in the wrong ZIP code can shorten your life

A person in the US can expect to live an average of 78.8 years. But that number can change by decades depending on the community they come from.
Breast cancer is more survivable than ever. Strength training is a key to helping women survive well. wavebreakmedia/Shutterstock.com

Breast cancer survivors, who lose muscle mass, can benefit from strength training, studies suggest

Breast cancer, once a death sentence, now has a survival rate of more than 90 percent. This means that millions of women suffer effects of treatment. Recent research shows ways to overcome them.
Professor Fabian V. Filipp lectures on the biology of malignant melanoma and pigmentation disease. The color of skin is due to the presence of a pigment called melanin, which can absorb cancer-causing sunlight. Photo by Systems Biology and Cancer Metabolism Laboratory, Fabian V. Filipp. Used with permission. CC BY-SA.

Success of immunotherapy stimulates future pigment cell and melanoma research

An international team of researchers is probing the links between skin diseases, including cancer, to speed the search for cures.
Ted Turner and former wife Jane Fonda, picture in 1991, when the high-profile couple were dating. John Barrett/PHOTOlink/ MediaPunch /IPX/AP

Ted Turner has Lewy body dementia, but what is that?

Media pioneer Ted Turner's announcement that he has Lewy body dementia brings the illness into the spotlight, which is rare. A neurologist explains why it's hard to even get a correct diagnosis.
James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo win the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their foundational work on cancer immunotherapy. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Kyoto University

2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: a turning point in the war on cancer

James Allison and Tasuku Honjo won the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for encouraging immune cells to attack cancer. See how their work has revolutionized cancer therapies and medicine.
Most men are not sexual predators and enjoy the closeness of the people they love. Pink Panda/Shutterstock.com

Most men do not perpetrate sexual violence against women

In the wake of the #MeToo movement and women finally feeling free to discuss having been sexually assaulted, it may seem like all men are predators. A trauma psychologist says this is far from true.
University of Florida scientists will be analyzing every cell in the pancreas, among other organs, to understand the roots of Type 1 diabetes. Magic mine/Shutterstock.com

Mapping the 100 trillion cells that make up your body

First, scientists wanted to decode all three billions units of the human genome. Now, a new effort will identify all the cell types in the human body to discover the roots of diseases, like diabetes.
Large scar after surgery on the abdomen young woman. OneSideProFoto/SHutterstock.com

Why older skin heals with less scarring

When kids get injured their skin heals fast, but usually with nasty-looking scars. Now scientists studying the genes of old mice have figured out how they regenerate skin and block scars.
Healthy aging is a new norm, researchers say, with older adults having a new name and attitude. By YAKOBCHUK VIACHESLAV/Shutterstock.com

As life expectancies rise, so are expectations for healthy aging

The age of the US is increasing, and with it, new expectations of health and happiness. Is the US prepared for the wave of baby boomers who will live long and want to be as healthy as they do?
Falls are the No. 1 cause of accidental death in people 65 and older and a major cause of disability. Photographee.eu/Shutterstock.com

Before the fall: How oldsters can avoid one of old age’s most dangerous events

Saturday isn't just the first day of fall. It's also the 10th annual National Falls Prevention Awareness Day. Falls are a major cause of disability in seniors. Experts explain ways to prevent them.