Health – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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Alex Azar, secretary for US Health and Human Services, spoke with senators about the coronavirus on Feb. 25. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

How can we prepare for the coronavirus? 3 questions answered

With the coronavirus spreading to more countries, public health officials in the US are warning Americans that coronavirus will become a problem in the US, too. What does this mean for you?
Bill Chen at San Francisco International Airport after arriving on a flight from Shanghai. Chen said his temperature was screened at the Shanghai airport before he departed. AP Photo/Terry Chea

Airplanes spread diseases quickly – so maybe unvaccinated people shouldn’t be allowed to fly

Air transportation unquestionably spreads disease. Should airlines be more proactive by requiring proof of vaccination? Two experts reflect on the current and former crises.
Blacks have twice the incidence rates for Alzheimer’s as whites. Getty Images / Science Photo Library

Blacks are at higher risk for Alzheimer’s, but why?

Blacks are at higher risk for many diseases. This is partly due to poverty, discrimination and lack of access to care. But there may be something different about the higher rates of Alzheimer's.
The rewards for doing this usually aren’t monetary. Glenn Koenig/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Paying all blood donors might not be worth it

Because most people want to be perceived as generous, sometimes monetary incentives for doing a good deed are counterproductive.
The stress over their ability to swallow can provoke a great deal of anxiety in patients. eyepark/Shutterstock.com

Assisted dying is not the easy way out

Nine states and the District of Columbia currently have laws that permit assisted dying, but the laws are so restrictive that they are often more hurdle than help.
A police officer in Beijing adjusts his face mask, which millions in China are using in hopes of preventing coronavirus infection, on Feb. 9, 2020. The virus is causing major disruptions. AP Photo/Andy Wong

The silent threat of the coronavirus: America’s dependence on Chinese pharmaceuticals

While US residents may feel safe from the effects of the coronavirus, the aftershocks could be damaging in unexpected ways. The disruption to China's supply chain could cause drug shortages.
Decontee Sawyer, wife of Liberian government official Patrick Sawyer, a naturalized American who died from Ebola after traveling from Liberia to Nigeria, on July 29, 2014. AP Photo/Craig Lassig

Fighting coronavirus fear with empathy: Lessons learned from how Africans got blamed for Ebola

Immigrants experienced stigma and blame during the Ebola crisis when in fact many were instrumental in stopping the spread of the disease. A scholar who studied that response offers insights.
Former President Jimmy Carter pictured at an Atlanta Braves-Toronto Blue Jays game in Atlanta on Sept. 17, 2015, shortly after being treated for melanoma. AP Photo/John Bazemore

Cancer deaths decline in US, with advances in prevention, detection and treatment

Cancer mortality has dropped in the US, due largely to lower smoking rates, as well as early detection and better treatments. These advances often do not extend to people in developing nations.
A horseshoe bat chasing a moth. Horseshoe bats were the source of SARS. Scientists consider bats to be a possible source of coronavirus. DE AGOSTINI PICTURE LIBRARY / Contributor

A clue to stopping coronavirus: Knowing how viruses adapt from animals to humans

Some of the world's worst diseases have come from animals. Bats, cows, camels and horses have all contributed. Now, scientists are working to know which animal introduced the new coronavirus.